Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Consumption of bioactive molecules protecting from necrotising enterocolitis in premature newborns receiving natural or pasteurised human milk
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Consumption of bioactive molecules protecting from necrotising enterocolitis in premature newborns receiving natural or pasteurised human milk
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Consumption of bioactive molecules protecting from necrotising enterocolitis in premature newborns receiving natural or pasteurised human milk
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

The aim of the present study was to investigate, in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) premature newborns susceptible to developing a necrotising enterocolitis (NEC), the consumption of bioactive molecules (DHA, sphingomyelin (SM), acid sphingomyelinase (Smase), and CD14) over 1 month, and to compare their levels in natural mother's milk (NM) v. pasteurised mother's milk from a milk bank (PM).

Nine VLBW premature newborn babies (<1 kg body weight, <32 weeks of gestational age) were followed up for 4 weeks after the commencement of digestive stimulation using NM or PM( 1 ) (feeding rate 10–140 ml/kg body weight per d). A representative sample of the feeds was collected for a complete day in each week of the study. Milk lipids were extracted for lipid quantification( 2 ), determination of the fatty acid profile (by GC) and identification and quantification of classes of phospholipid (PL; by 31P NMR). Acid Smase activity was measured using radiolabelled SM( 3 ) and CD14 was quantified using ELISA.

DHA levels were not different in NM and PM but were low compared with the nutritional recommendations (% total fatty acids; NM, 0.39 (se 0.23; range 0.17–0.85); PM, 0.33 (se 0.09; range 0.22–0.55)). The proportion of SM was similar between groups (28–30% total PL) but levels varied among all milk samples from 0.07 mm to 0.17 mm. Consumption of SM varied from 3 to 27 mg/d; SM has been shown to have a beneficial effect on gut maturity at levels of 60–150 mg/d( 4 ). Acid Smase activity was significantly lower (30%) in PM than in NM (pmol/h per ml; 215 v. 308 respectively; P<0.01), and soluble CD14 was not detected in PM while in NM the level ranged from 9 to 21 μg/ml, leading to a consumption of 0.4–3.3 mg/d.

The present preliminary study raises several questions: (1) what are the minimal amounts of each bioactive molecule that can protect against NEC; (2) is PM quality sufficient to protect against NEC; (3) what are the main reasons for the low level of DHA in the milk of these Mediterranean mothers (nutritional and/or genetic).

The authors thank the Benjamin Delessert Institute for financial support.

1. Berseth, CL, Bisquera, JA & Paje, VU (2003) Pediatrics 111, 529534.

2. Hernell, O, Staggers, JE & Carey, MC (1990) Biochemistry 29, 20412056.

3. Wu, J, Cheng, Y, Jonsson, BA, Nilsson, A & Duan, RD (2005) J Lipid Res 46, 19441952.

4. Motouri, M, Matsuyama, H, Yamamura, J, Tanaka, M, Aoe, S, Iwanaga, T & Kawakami, H (2003) J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 36, 241247.