Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Conjugated linoleic acid feeding during rat suckling period enhances intestinal IgA production
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Conjugated linoleic acid feeding during rat suckling period enhances intestinal IgA production
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Conjugated linoleic acid feeding during rat suckling period enhances intestinal IgA production
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a mixture of isomers of linoleic acid, of which cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 are the major constituents. These compounds induce beneficial effects on health and it has been suggested that they may modulate immune responses. However, as in man, mucosal Ig production is poorly developed during the suckling period in rats. The aim of the present work was to establish the effect of CLA on mucosal immunity during suckling by determining IgA levels in intestinal washes from 28-d-old Wistar rats by an ELISA technique. IgA and PPAR-γ (as a possible mediator of the CLA effect) mRNA expression in small intestine and colon from 21- and 28-d-old Wistar rats was also evaluated by real-time PCR. Pregnant Wistar rats were obtained on day 7 of gestation. On the day of birth pups were divided into eight different groups. Four groups were analysed on day 21: litters from mothers fed with CLA (80% cis-9, trans-11, 20% trans-10, cis-12; Lipid Nutrition B. V. Wormerveer, The Netherlands;10 g/kg pellet chow) during gestation and lactation (A); CLA only during gestation but litters received a CLA isomer mixture by daily oral supplementation during suckling (B); exclusively receiving CLA by oral administration during the suckling period (C); a parallel-age reference group. Another four groups were studied at 28 d old: litters receiving CLA from day 1 to 28 (D); from day 1 to 21 (X); from weaning to day 28 (E); a parallel-age reference group (Z). On days 21 and 28 rats were killed and samples from the small intestine and colon were removed for RNA extraction for later real-time PCR. Taqman® specific probes and primers were used for each gene (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA). Target gene expression was normalised by GADH and β-actin endogenous controls in each sample. In all cases statistical analysis was performed by conventional ANOVA, and when the experimental group variable had a significant effect on the dependent variable post hoc comparisons (LSD test) were performed. Differences were considered to be significant at P<0.05. The results provided evidence that mucosal production of IgA increased in animals supplemented with CLA during suckling by increasing IgA mRNA expression in the small intestine and colon and IgA protein in 28-d-old rats (see Table). PPARγ gene expression was also up regulated in animals receiving CLA during early life. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with CLA during suckling enhances the development of the immune system in Wistar rats. Moreover, the effect of CLA supplementation is better when supplementation is given earlier and for longer.

Mean values were significantly different from those for groups E, X and Z (n 4–5): *P<0.05.