Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Association between overall fruit and vegetable intake, and fruit and vegetable sub-types and blood pressure: the PRIME study
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Association between overall fruit and vegetable intake, and fruit and vegetable sub-types and blood pressure: the PRIME study
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Association between overall fruit and vegetable intake, and fruit and vegetable sub-types and blood pressure: the PRIME study
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Hypertension is a major public health challenge and an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). According to the 2017 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association ACC/AHA Guideline definitions, the overall prevalence of hypertension in US adults was 45·6%(1). Lifestyle interventions form the cornerstone of high blood pressure therapy(2). Increased fruit and vegetable (FV) intake has been associated with reduced blood pressure (BP)(3), but it is less clear whether this association depends on type of FV.

This study aimed to examine the cross-sectional association between overall FV intake and specific types of FV (citrus fruit, other fruit, fruit juice, cooked vegetables and raw vegetables) and BP in France and Northern Ireland.

A total of 10660 men aged 50–59 years were recruited from 1991 to 1993. BP was measured in a clinic setting, and dietary intake was assessed by a short food-frequency questionnaire. Statistical analysis (analysis of baseline characteristics and logistic regression) was performed by SPSS programme v22·0.

Baseline demographic characteristics differed between countries except systolic blood pressure. After adjusting for potential confounders, including age, country, socioeconomic variables and other CVD risk factors, the odds ratio for hypertension based on systolic blood pressure (>140 mmHg) per portion of fruit, vegetable and juice overall was 0·95 (CI% 0·91, 1·00), 0·93 (CI% 0·89, 0·98) per portion intake of other fruit, 0·86 (CI% 0·80, 0·91) per portion intake of raw vegetables, 0·98 (0·94, 1·02) per portion intake of citrus fruit, 1·02 (CI% 0·98, 1·06) per portion intake of fruit juice and 1·05 (CI% 0·99, 1·10) per portion intake of cooked vegetables. The odds ratio for hypertension based on diastolic BP (>90 mmHg) per portion intake of fruit, vegetables and juice was 0·94 (CI 0·90, 0·98), 0·90 (CI 0·85, 0·95) per portion intake of other fruit, 0·83 (CI 0·77, 0·89) per portion intake of raw vegetables, 0·99 (CI 0·95, 1·03) per portion intake of citrus fruit, 1·04 (CI 1·00, 1·08) per portion intake of fruit juice and 0·99 (CI 0·94, 1·05) per portion intake of cooked vegetables.

In conclusion, high intake of fruit, vegetable and juice overall, other fruit and raw vegetables was inversely associated with risk of hypertension, suggesting that the strength of the association between these fruit and vegetables classes and blood pressure might be related to the type consumed, or to processing or cooking-related factors.

1.Muntner, P, Carey, RM, Gidding, S et al. (2017) Circulation (2), 109–18.
2.O'Connell, S (2011) Nurs Times 110 (14), 12–4.
3.Saneei, P, Salehi-Abargouei, A, Esmaillzadeh, A et al. (2014) NMCD 24 (12), 1253–61.