Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78dcdb465f-bmnx5 Total loading time: 0.323 Render date: 2021-04-18T00:42:57.500Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Investigating the Impact of Spatial Augmented Reality on Communication between Design Session Participants - A Pilot Study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2019

Lorenzo Giunta
Affiliation:
University of Bath;
Fatma Ben Guefrache
Affiliation:
Université Grenoble Alpes;
Elies Dekoninck
Affiliation:
University of Bath;
James Gopsill
Affiliation:
University of Bath;
Jamie O'Hare
Affiliation:
University of Bath;
Federico Morosi
Affiliation:
Politecnico di Milano
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

SAR provides an unobtrusive implementation of AR and enables multiple stakeholders to observe and interact with an augmented physical model. This is synonymous with co-design activities and hence, there is a potential for SAR to have a significant impact in the way design teams may set-up and run their co-design activities in the future. Whilst there are a growing number of studies which apply SAR to design activities, few studies exist that examine a particular element of a design activity in a controlled manner. This paper will begin to fill this gap through the controlled study of SAR and its effects on the communication between participants of a co-design activity. To do so the paper compares a controlled design session, using more traditional methods of design representations (3D models on a screen), to sessions run using SAR. The sessions are then analysed to gather information on the gestures used by the participants as well as the overall efficiency of the participants at completing the set design task. The paper concludes that the data gathered tentatively supports a link between the use of SAR and improved communication between design session participants.

Type
Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2019

References

Akaoka, E., Ginn, T. and Vertegaal, R. (2010), “DisplayObjects: Prototyping Functional Physical Interfaces on 3D Styrofoam, Paper or Cardboard Models”, in Proceedings of the fourth international conference on Tangible, embedded, and embodied interaction - TEI ’10. ACM Press, New York, New York, USA, p. 49. http://doi.org/10.1145/1709886.1709897CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bellucci, G., Becattini, N., Cascini, G., O'Hare, J., Majoral, X., Boujut, J.-F. and Ben-Guefrache, F. (2018), “D5.1 validation at end users’ premises. Available at: http://spark-project.net/sites/default/files/file-wp/D5.1_WP5_Validationatend-userspremises.pdf.Google Scholar
Ben-Guefrache, F., Masclet, C., Prudhomme, G., Cascini, G. and O'Hare, J. A. (2018), “Real-Time Coding Method For Capture Of Artefact-Centric Iinteractions In Co-Creative Design Sessions”, in International Design Conference - Design 2018, pp. 3344. http://doi.org/10.21278/idc.2018.0468CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ben-Guefreche, F., Boujut, J.-F., Masclet, C., Poulin, M., Prudhomme, G., Becattini, N., Carbone, N., O'Hare, J., Giunta, L., Dekoninck, E. and Cascini, G. (2018), “Results of the experiments benchmarking the platform. Available at: http://spark-project.net/sites/default/files/file-wp/D4.2_WP4_Results_of_the_experiments_benchmarking_the_platform.pdf.Google Scholar
Bimber, O. and Raskar, R. (2005), “Spatial Augmented Reality Merging Real and Virtual Worlds. A K Peters, WellesleyCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boa, D. R. and Hicks, B. (2016), “Discriminating engineering information interaction using eye tracking and an information operations model”, in Proceedings of International Design Conference, DESIGN 2016, pp. 110.Google Scholar
Cross, N., Christiaans, H. and Dorst, K. (1996), Analysing design activity. Wiley, New York, New York, USA.Google Scholar
Furht, B. (ed.) (2011), Handbook of Augmented Reality. New York, NY: Springer, New York. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-0064-6CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Giunta, L., Dekoninck, E., Gopsill, J. and Hare, J. O. (2018), “A Review of Augmented Reality Research for Design Practice : Looking to the Future”, in “NordDesign 2018. Available at: https://www.designsociety.org/publication/40967/A+Review+of+Augmented+Reality+Research+for+Design+Practice%3A+Looking+to+the+Future.Google Scholar
Gopsill, J., Snider, C., Shi, L. and Hicks, B. (2016), “Computer aided design user interaction as a sensor for monitoring engineers and the engineering design process”, in Proceedings of International Design Conference, DESIGN 2016, pp. 17071718.Google Scholar
van Krevelen, D. W. F. and Poelman, R. (2010), “A Survey of Augmented Reality Technologies, Applications and Limitations”, The International Journal of Virtual Reality, Vol. 9 No. 2, pp. 120.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morosi, F., Carli, I., Caruso, G., Cascini, G., Dhokia, V. and Ben-Guefrache, F. (2018), “Analysis of Co-Design Scenarios and Activities for the Development of a Spatial-Augmented Reality Design Platform”, in International Design Conference - Design 2018, pp. 381392. http://doi.org/10.21278/idc.2018.0504CrossRefGoogle Scholar
O'Hare, J. A., Dekoninck, E., Giunta, L., Boujut, J. and Becattini, N. (2018), “Exploring the Performance of Augmented Reality Technologies in Co- Creative Sessions : Initial Results From Controlled Experiments”, International Design Conference - Design 2018, pp. 405416. http://doi.org/10.21278/idc.2018.0391CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Park, H. and Moon, H.-C. (2013), “Design evaluation of information appliances using augmented reality-based tangible interaction”, Computers in Industry. Elsevier B.V., Vol. 64 No. 7, pp. 854868. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.compind.2013.05.006Google Scholar
Payne, A. F., Storbacka, K. and Frow, P. (2008), “Managing the co-creation of value”, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, Vol. 36 No. 1, pp. 8396. http://doi.org/10.1007/s11747-007-0070-0CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Porter, S. R., Marner, M. R., Smith, R. T., Zucco, J. E. and Thomas, B. H. (2010), “Validating spatial augmented reality for interactive rapid prototyping”, in 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality. IEEE, pp. 265266. http://doi.org/10.1109/ISMAR.2010.5643599CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Prahalad, C. K. and Ramaswamy, V. (2004), “Co-creation experiences: The next practice in value creation”, Journal of Interactive Marketing. Elsevier, Vol. 18 No. 3, pp. 514. http://doi.org/10.1002/dir.20015CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sanders, E. B.-N. and Stappers, P. J. (2008), “Co-creation and the new landscapes of design”, CoDesign, Vol. 4 No. 1, pp. 518. http://doi.org/10.1080/15710880701875068CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ulrich, P. V., Jo Anderson-Connell, L. and Wu, W. (2003), “Consumer co-design of apparel for mass customization”, Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, Vol. 7 No. 4, pp. 398412. http://doi.org/10.1108/13612020310496985CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 196 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 26th July 2019 - 18th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

You have Access
Open access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Investigating the Impact of Spatial Augmented Reality on Communication between Design Session Participants - A Pilot Study
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Investigating the Impact of Spatial Augmented Reality on Communication between Design Session Participants - A Pilot Study
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Investigating the Impact of Spatial Augmented Reality on Communication between Design Session Participants - A Pilot Study
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *