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Integrating the Product Development Process in Scientific Research. Bridging the Research-Market Gap

  • David Mesa (a1), Christine Thong (a1), Charles Ranscombe (a1) and Blair Kuys (a1)

Abstract

Science and technology generated by Universities has many challenges in reaching commercial product applications, as has been explored in a range of literature. Product design has been identified to add value through various types of contributions in addressing these challenges; however, there remains a gap in literature to explore how and when product development activities can practically be applied to technology development.

This paper furthers the idea that the product development process can help bridge the gap between the laboratory and commercial applications by proposing a framework for how Ulrich and Eppinger's product development process can integrate with the STAM technology development model. This is a significant step towards understanding how in practice these disciplines can work together to bring science and technology from the laboratory to products in the marketplace.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

Corresponding author

Contact: Mesa, David, Swinburne University of Technology, Department of Interior Architecture and Industrial Design, Australia, dmesa@swin.edu.au

References

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Keywords

Integrating the Product Development Process in Scientific Research. Bridging the Research-Market Gap

  • David Mesa (a1), Christine Thong (a1), Charles Ranscombe (a1) and Blair Kuys (a1)

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