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Industry Trends to 2040

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2019

Claudia Eckert
Affiliation:
The Open University;
Ola Isaksson
Affiliation:
Chalmers University of Technology;
Sophie Hallstedt
Affiliation:
Blekinge Institute of Technology;
Johan Malmqvist
Affiliation:
Chalmers University of Technology;
Anna Öhrwall Rönnbäck
Affiliation:
Luleå University of Technology
Massimo Panarotto
Affiliation:
Chalmers University of Technology;
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The engineering design community needs to development tools and methods now to support emerging technological and societal trends. While many forecasts exist for technological and societal changes, this paper reports on the findings of a workshop, which addressed trends in engineering design to 2040. The paper summarises the key findings from the six themes of the workshop: societal trends, ways of working, lifelong learning, technology, modelling and simulation and digitisation; and points to the challenge of understanding how these trends affect each other

Type
Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2019

References

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