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Global Optimisation of Car Front-End Geometry to Minimise Pedestrian Head Injury Levels

Part of: Mobility

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2019

Abstract

The paper presents a multidisciplinary design optimisation strategy for car front-end profile to minimise head injury criteria across pedestrian groups. A hybrid modelling strategy was used to simulate the car- pedestrian impact events, combining parametric modelling of front-car geometry with pedestrian models for the kinematics of crash impact. A space filling response surface modelling strategy was deployed to study the head injury response, with Optimal Latin Hypercube (OLH) Design of Experiments sampling and Kriging technique to fit response models. The study argues that the optimisation of the front-end car geometry for each of the individual pedestrian models, using evolutionary optimisation algorithms is not an effective global optimization strategy as the solutions are not acceptable for other pedestrian groups. Collaborative Optimisation (CO) multidisciplinary design optimisation architecture is introduced instead as a global optimisation strategy, and proven that it can enable simultaneous minimisation of head injury levels for all the pedestrian groups, delivering a global optimum solution which meets the safety requirements across the pedestrian groups.

Type
Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2019

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