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Designing Products with a Focus on Self-Explanatory Assembly, a Case Study

  • Davy Daniël Parmentier (a1), Jan Detand (a1) and Jelle Saldien (a1) (a2)

Abstract

Designing products with a focus on self-explanatory assembly can reduce the use of procedural instructions and the associated problems. This paper describes how different groups of students, in two different design-engineering courses designed or redesigned products in an attempt to make the assembly of the product self-explanatory. The design outcomes are discussed in relation to the design context and linked to existing theory on design for meaning.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

Corresponding author

Contact: Parmentier, Davy Daniël, Ghent University, Department of Industrial Systems Engineering and Product Design, Belgium, davy.parmentier@ugent.be

References

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Keywords

Designing Products with a Focus on Self-Explanatory Assembly, a Case Study

  • Davy Daniël Parmentier (a1), Jan Detand (a1) and Jelle Saldien (a1) (a2)

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