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Biomimicry Design Education Essentials

  • Laura Stevens (a1), Marc M.J. De Vries (a2), Mark M.J.W. Bos (a1) and Helen Kopnina (a1)

Abstract

The emerging field of biomimicry and learning to design with and for nature has expanded in recent years through a diversity of educational programs. Inspiration following natural forms may give the appearance of being sustainable, but the question remains, how sustainable is it? Misunderstanding the function of these forms may leave designers with products not as sustainable as desired. Biomimicry education addresses these issues by integrating three essential elements into their design thinking phases and by using analogical transfer while doing so. This field learns from nature as model, nature as measure, and nature as mentor, throughout the design process. Through examination, analyses and verification of students designs and reflective processes at The Hague University of Applied Sciences, this research considers natures analogies in educational factors, determining which elements are influential when incorporating biomimicry into design education.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

Corresponding author

Contact: Stevens, Laura, Delft University of Technology / The Hague University of Applied Sciences, TNW / IDE, The Netherlands, laura.l.stevens@gmail.com

References

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Keywords

Biomimicry Design Education Essentials

  • Laura Stevens (a1), Marc M.J. De Vries (a2), Mark M.J.W. Bos (a1) and Helen Kopnina (a1)

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