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Young Brown Dwarfs as Giant Exoplanet Analogs

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 January 2014

Jacqueline K. Faherty
Affiliation:
Department of Astronomy, Universidad de Chile Cerro Calan, Las Condes Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10023
Kelle L. Cruz
Affiliation:
Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10023 Department of Physics & Astronomy, Hunter College, 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA
Emily L. Rice
Affiliation:
Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10023 Department of Engineering Science & Physics, College of Staten Island, 2800 Victory Blvd., Staten Island, NY 10301USA
Adric Riedel
Affiliation:
Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10023 Department of Physics & Astronomy, Hunter College, 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA
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Abstract

Young brown dwarfs and directly-imaged exoplanets have enticingly similar photometric and spectroscopic characteristics, indicating that their cool, low gravity atmospheres should be studied in concert. Similarities between the peculiar shaped H band, near and mid-IR photometry as well as location on color magnitude diagrams provide important clues about how to extract physical properties of planets from current brown dwarf observations. In this proceeding we discuss systems newly assigned to 10-150 Myr nearby moving groups, highlight the diversity of this uniform age-calibrated brown dwarf sample, and reflect on their implication for understanding current and future planetary data.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2013 

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