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Population III Very-Massive Stars—Their Evolution and Explosion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 December 2005


Takuya Ohkubo
Affiliation:
Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan email: ohkubo@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, umeda@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, nomoto@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp
H. Umeda
Affiliation:
Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan email: ohkubo@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, umeda@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, nomoto@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp
K. Maeda
Affiliation:
Department of Earth Science and Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, Japan email: maeda@esa.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp
K. Nomoto
Affiliation:
Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan email: ohkubo@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, umeda@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, nomoto@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp
S. Tsuruta
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840, USA email: uphst@gemini.msu.montana.edu
M.J. Rees
Affiliation:
Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambrigde CB3 0HA, UK email: mjr@ast.cam.ac.uk

Abstract

We calculate evolution, explosion and nucleosynthesis of 1000$M_{\odot}$ stars. Even such massive stars may explode at the end of their lives if they rotate. We use a 2 dimensional hydrodynamical code to take aspherisity by the effect of rotation into account. Our results show that (1) abundance pattern of ejected matter by explosion is consistent with observational data of intracluster medium gas and M82 hot gas, (2) such massive stars can supply more efficient UV photons to re-ionize HI, HeI and HeII than ordinary massive stars (less than 100 solar-masses) and (3) final black hole mass is 500 solar-mass, which is consistent of the mass scale of intermediate-mass black hole (IHBH) found in M82.


Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
© 2005 International Astronomical Union

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