Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684bc48f8b-4z9h4 Total loading time: 20.679 Render date: 2021-04-13T10:32:26.055Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

A New Spin on Red Giant Rapid Rotators: Evidence for Chemical Exchange Between Planets and Evolved Stars

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2010

Joleen K. Carlberg
Affiliation:
Dept. of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904
Steven R. Majewski
Affiliation:
Dept. of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904
Verne V. Smith
Affiliation:
National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ, 85719
Katia Cunha
Affiliation:
National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ, 85719
Richard J. Patterson
Affiliation:
Dept. of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904
Dmitry Bizyaev
Affiliation:
Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM, 88349
Phil Arras
Affiliation:
Dept. of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904
Robert T. Rood
Affiliation:
Dept. of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Rapid rotation in red giant stars may be one signature of the past engulfment of a planetary companion. Models of the future tidal interaction of known exoplanet host stars with their planets show that many of these stars will accrete one or more of their planets, and the orbital angular momentum of these accreted planets is sometimes sufficient to spin up the host stars to a level commonly accepted as “rapid rotation” for giant stars. Planets accreted during the red giant phase should leave behind a chemical signature in the form of unusual abundance patterns in the host red giant's atmosphere. Proposed signatures of planet accretion include the enhancement of Li and 12C; both species are generally depleted in giant star atmospheres by convection but could be replenished by planet accretion. Moreover, accreted planets may preferentially enhance the stellar abundance of refractory elements assuming that the refractory nature of these elements leads to their relative enhancements in the planets themselves. Here we present preliminary results of a search for these predicted chemical signatures through high resolution spectroscopic abundance analysis of both rapidly rotating giant stars (i.e., stars with a higher probability of having experienced planet accretion) and normally rotating giant stars. We find that the rapid rotators are enhanced in Li relative to the slow rotators — a result consistent with Li replenishment through planet absorption.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2010

References

Bizyaev, D., Smith, V. V., Arenas, J., Geisler, D., Majewski, S. R., Patterson, R. J., Cunha, K., Del Pardo, C., Suntzef, N. B., & Gieren, W. 2006, AJ, 131, 1784CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brown, J. A., Sneden, C., Lambert, D. L., & Dutchover, E. J. 1989, ApJS, 71, 293CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carlberg, J. K., Majewski, S. R., & Arras, P. 2009, ApJ, 700, 832CrossRefGoogle Scholar
de Medeiros, J. R. & Mayor, M. 1999, A&AS, 139, 433Google Scholar
de Medeiros, J. R., do Nascimento, J. D. Jr., Sankarankutty, S., Costa, J. M., & Maia, M. R. G. 2000, A&A, 363, 239Google Scholar
Drake, N. A., de la Reza, R., da Silva, L., & Lambert, D. L. 2002, AJ, 123, 2703CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Girardi, L., Bressan, A., Bertelli, G., & Chiosi, C. 2000, A&AS, 141,Google Scholar
Sneden, C. A. 1973, PhD thesis, The University of Texas at AustinGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 68 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 13th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Access Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

A New Spin on Red Giant Rapid Rotators: Evidence for Chemical Exchange Between Planets and Evolved Stars
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

A New Spin on Red Giant Rapid Rotators: Evidence for Chemical Exchange Between Planets and Evolved Stars
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

A New Spin on Red Giant Rapid Rotators: Evidence for Chemical Exchange Between Planets and Evolved Stars
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *