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Measuring the Stellar Halo Velocity Anisotropy With 3D Kinematics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 May 2016

Emily C. Cunningham
Affiliation:
Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics, UC Santa Cruz 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
Alis J. Deason
Affiliation:
Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics, UC Santa Cruz 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA Physics Department, Stanford University 382 Via Pueblo Rd, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
Puragra Guhathakurta
Affiliation:
Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics, UC Santa Cruz 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
Constance M. Rockosi
Affiliation:
Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics, UC Santa Cruz 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
Roeland P. van der Marel
Affiliation:
Space Telescope Science Institute 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
S. Tony Sohn
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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Abstract

We present the first measurement of the anisotropy parameter β using 3D kinematic information outside of the solar neighborhood. Our sample consists of 13 Milky Way halo stars with measured proper motions and radial velocities in the line of sight of M31. Proper motions were measured using deep, multi-epoch HST imaging, and radial velocities were measured from Keck II/DEIMOS spectra. We measure β = −0.3−0.9+0.4, which is consistent with isotropy, and inconsistent with measurements in the solar neighborhood. We suggest that this may be the kinematic signature of a relatively early, massive accretion event, or perhaps several such events.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2016 

References

Abadi, M.G., Navarro, J.F., & Steinmetz, M. 2006, MNRAS, 365, 747CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cunningham, E. C., Deason, A. J., Guhathakurta, P., et al. 2016, arXiv:1602.03180Google Scholar
Deason, A. J., Belokurov, V., Evans, N. W., & Johnston, K. V. 2013a, ApJ, 763, 113CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Deason, A. J., Van der Marel, R. P., Guhathakurta, P., Sohn, S. T., & Brown, T. M. 2013b, ApJ, 766, 24CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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