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Kepler Reliability and Occurrence Rates

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 October 2016

Steve Bryson
Affiliation:
NASA Ames Research Center email: steve.bryson@nasa.gov
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Abstract

The Kepler mission has produced tables of exoplanet candidates (“KOI table”), as well as tables of transit detections (“TCE table”), hosted at the Exoplanet Archive (http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu). Transit detections in the TCE table that are plausibly due to a transiting object are selected for inclusion in the KOI table. KOI table entries that have not been identified as false positives (FPs) or false alarms (FAs) are classified as planet candidates (PCs, Mullally et al. 2015). A subset of PCs have been confirmed as planetary transits with greater than 99% probability, but most PCs have <99% probability of being true planets. The fraction of PCs that are true transiting planets is the PC reliability rate. The overall PC population is believed to have a reliability rate >90% (Morton & Johnson 2011).

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2016 

References

Burke, C. J., et al. 2015 ApJ 809, 1 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morton, T. D. & Johnson, J. A. 2011, ApJ 738, 170 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mullally, F., et al. 2015, ApJS 21, l 31 CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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