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The cosmic web and microwave background fossilize the first turbulent combustion

  • Carl H. Gibson (a1) and R. Norris Keeler (a2)

Abstract

Collisional fluid mechanics theory predicts a turbulent hot big bang at Planck conditions from large, negative, turbulence stresses below the Fortov-Kerr limit (< −10113 Pa). Big bang turbulence fossilized when quarks formed, extracting the mass energy of the universe by extreme negative viscous stresses of inflation, expanding to length scales larger than the horizon scale ct. Viscous-gravitational structure formation by fragmentation was triggered at big bang fossil vorticity turbulence vortex lines during the plasma epoch, as observed by the Planck space telescope. A cosmic web of protogalaxies, protogalaxyclusters, and protogalaxysuperclusters that formed in turbulent boundary layers of the spinning voids are hereby identified as expanding turbulence fossils that falsify CDMHC cosmology.

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References

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The cosmic web and microwave background fossilize the first turbulent combustion

  • Carl H. Gibson (a1) and R. Norris Keeler (a2)

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