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The role of automated methods for filament finding in understanding the complex relationship between filaments, magnetic fields and star formation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 January 2020

Maria R. Cunningham
Affiliation:
School of Physics, University of New South Wales Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia email: maria.cunningham@unsw.edu.au
Claire-Elise Green
Affiliation:
School of Physics, University of New South Wales Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia email: maria.cunningham@unsw.edu.au
Paul A. Jones
Affiliation:
School of Physics, University of New South Wales Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia email: maria.cunningham@unsw.edu.au
Giles Novak
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy North-Western University 2145 Sheridan Road Evanston, IL 60208-3112 USA
Laura Fissel
Affiliation:
NRAO Charlottesville USA
Corresponding

Abstract

The discovery of the ubiquity of filaments in the interstellar medium in the last two decades has begged the question: “What role do filaments play in star formation?” Here we describe how our automated filament finding algorithms can combine with both magnetic field measurements and high-resolution observations of dense cores in these filaments, to provide a statistically large sample to investigate the effect of filaments on star formation. We find that filaments are likely actively accreting mass from the interstellar medium, explaining why some 60% of stars, and all massive stars, form “on-filament”.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
© International Astronomical Union 2020 

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