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Near-Earth object population and formation of lunar craters during the last billion of years

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 January 2020

Sergei I. Ipatov
Affiliation:
Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry of RAS, 119991, 19 Kosygin st., Moscow, Russia email: siipatov@hotmail.com
Ekaterina A. Feoktistova
Affiliation:
P.K. Sternberg Astronomical Institute, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119899, 13 Universitetsky Pr., Moscow, Russia
Vladimir V. Svetsov
Affiliation:
Institute of Dynamics of Geospheres of RAS, 119334, 38 Leninskii pr., Moscow, Russia
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

We compared the number of lunar craters with diameters greater than 15 km with age less than 1.1 Gyr in the region of the Oceanus Procellarum with the estimates of the number of craters made based on the number of near-Earth objects and on the characteristic times elapsed before collisions of near-Earth objects with the Moon. Our estimates allow the increase of the number of near-Earth objects after a recent catastrophic disruption of a large main-belt asteroid. However, destruction of some old craters and variations in orbital distribution of near-Earth objects with time could allow that the mean number of near-Earth objects during the last billion years could be close to the present value.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
© International Astronomical Union 2020 

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References

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