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Local analogs of high-redshift galaxies: Metallicity calibrations at high-redshift

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 June 2020

Fuyan Bian
Affiliation:
European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago19, Chile email: fbian@eso.org
Lisa J. Kewley
Affiliation:
Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611, Australia
Brent Groves
Affiliation:
Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611, Australia
Michael A. Dopita
Affiliation:
Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611, Australia
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

We study the metallicity calibrations in high-redshift galaxies using a sample of local analogs of high-redshift galaxies selected from the SDSS survey. Located in the same region on the BPT diagram as star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 2, these high-redshift analogs share the same ionized ISM conditions as high-redshift galaxies. We establish empirical metallicity calibrations between the direct gas-phase oxygen abundances and varieties of metallicity indicators in our local analogs using direct Te method. These new metallicity calibrations are the best means to measure the metallicity in high-redshift galaxies. There exist significant offsets between these new high-redshift metallicity calibrations and local calibrations. Such offsets are mainly driven by the evolution of the ionized ISM conditions from high-z to low-z.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
© International Astronomical Union 2020

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References

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