Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-d5zgf Total loading time: 0.273 Render date: 2021-03-04T13:32:33.479Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

The implications of clustered star formation for (proto)planetary systems and habitability

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 January 2020

J. M. Diederik Kruijssen
Affiliation:
Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstraß e 12-14, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany email: kruijssen@uni-heidelberg.de
Steven N. Longmore
Affiliation:
Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, IC2, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF, United Kingdom email: s.n.longmore@ljmu.ac.uk
Corresponding

Abstract

Star formation is spatially clustered across a range of environments, from dense stellar clusters to unbound associations. As a result, radiative or dynamical interactions with neighbouring stars disrupt (proto)planetary systems and limit their radii, leaving a lasting impact on their potential habitability. In the solar neighbourhood, we find that the vast majority of stars form in unbound associations, such that the interaction of (proto)planetary systems with neighbouring stars is limited to the densest sub-regions. However, the fraction of star formation occurring in compact clusters was considerably higher in the past, peaking at ∼50% in the young Milky Way at redshift z ∼ 2. These results demonstrate that the large-scale star formation environment affects the demographics of planetary systems and the occupation of the habitable zone. We show that planet formation is governed by multi-scale physics, in which Mpc-scale events such as galaxy mergers affect the AU-scale properties of (proto)planetary systems.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
© International Astronomical Union 2020 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Adamo, A., Kruijssen, J. M. D., Bastian, N., Silva-Villa, E., & Ryon, J., 2015, MNRAS, 452, 246 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bastian, N., 2008, MNRAS, 390, 759 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
de Juan Ovelar, M., Kruijssen, J. M. D., Bressert, E., Testi, L., Bastian, N., & Cánovas, H., 2012, A&A, 546, L1 Google Scholar
Eisner, J. A. et al., 2018, ApJ, 860, 77 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Elmegreen, B. G., 2008, ApJ, 672, 1006 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Genzel, R. et al., 2011, ApJ, 733, 101 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ginsburg, A., & Kruijssen, J. M. D., 2018, ApJL, 864, L17 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Henney, W. J., & O’Dell, C. R., 1999, AJ, 118, 2350 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johnson, L. C. et al., 2016, ApJ, 827, 33 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kruijssen, J. M. D., 2012, MNRAS, 426, 3008 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kruijssen, J. M. D., & Longmore, S. N., 2013, MNRAS, 435, 2598 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kruijssen, J. M. D., Maschberger, T., Moeckel, N., Clarke, C. J., Bastian, N., & Bonnell, I. A., 2012, MNRAS, 419, 841 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kruijssen, J. M. D., Pfeffer, J. L., Crain, R. A., & Bastian, N., 2019, MNRAS, 486, 3134 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Krumholz, M. R., & McKee, C. F., 2005, ApJ, 630, 250 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lada, C. J., & Lada, E. A., 2003, Annu. Rev. Astron. Astrophys., 41, 57 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leroy, A. K. et al., 2017, ApJ, 846, 71 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Longmore, S. N. et al., 2014, Protostars and Planets VI, 291 Google Scholar
Madau, P., & Dickinson, M., 2014, Annu. Rev. Astron. Astrophys., 52, 415 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Padoan, P., Nordlund, A., & Jones, B. J. T., 1997, MNRAS, 288, 145 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pfeffer, J., Kruijssen, J. M. D., Crain, R. A., & Bastian, N., 2018, MNRAS, 475, 4309 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rosotti, G. P., Dale, J. E., de Juan Ovelar, M., Hubber, D. A., Kruijssen, J. M. D., Ercolano, B., & Walch, S., 2014, MNRAS, 441, 2094 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scally, A., & Clarke, C., 2001, MNRAS, 325, 449 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Swinbank, A. M. et al., 2011, ApJ, 742, 11 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tacconi, L. J. et al., 2013, ApJ, 768, 74 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Utomo, D. et al., 2018, ApJL, 861, L18 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vazquez-Semadeni, E., 1994, ApJ, 423, 681 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ward, J. L., & Kruijssen, J. M. D., 2019, MNRAS, 475, 5659 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Winter, A. J., Clarke, C. J., Rosotti, G., Ih, J., Facchini, S., & Haworth, T. J., 2018, MNRAS, 478, 2700 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Winter, A. J., Kruijssen, J. M. D., Chevance, M., Keller, B. W., & Longmore, S. N., 2019, MNRAS submitted, arXiv:1907.04602Google Scholar

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 39 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 13th January 2020 - 4th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The implications of clustered star formation for (proto)planetary systems and habitability
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The implications of clustered star formation for (proto)planetary systems and habitability
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The implications of clustered star formation for (proto)planetary systems and habitability
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *