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ALMA witnesses the assembly of first galaxies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 June 2020

Stefano Carniani
Affiliation:
Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa, Italy email: stefano.carniani@sns.it
Corresponding
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Abstract

Characterising primeval galaxies entails the challenging goal of observing galaxies with modest star formation rates (SFR < 100 Mȯyr−1) and approaching the beginning of the reionisation epoch (z > 6). To date a large number of primeval galaxies have been identified thanks to deep near-infrared surveys. However, to further our understanding on the formation and evolution of such primeval objects, we must investigate their nature and physical properties through multi-band spectroscopic observations. Information on dust content, metallicity, interactions with the surrounding environment, and outflows can be obtained with ALMA observations of far-infrared (FIR) lines such as the [Cii] at 158 μm and [Oiii] at 88 μm. Here, we, thus, discuss the recent results unveiled by ALMA observations and present new [Cii] observations of BDF-3299, a star-forming galaxy at z = 7.1 showing a spatial and spectral offset between the rest-frame UV and the FIR lines emission.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
© International Astronomical Union 2020

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