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Non-additivity of feedstuffs examined in vitro and the influence of incubation medium pH

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 November 2017

F.L. Mould
Affiliation:
Department of Agriculture, The University of Reading, Earley Gate, PO Box 236, Reading, RG6 6AT, UK
D. Colomabtto
Affiliation:
Department of Agriculture, The University of Reading, Earley Gate, PO Box 236, Reading, RG6 6AT, UK
G. Hervas
Affiliation:
Estación Agricola Experimental, CSIS. Apdo. 788, 24088 – León, Spain
F. Ibrir
Affiliation:
Department of Agriculture, The University of Reading, Earley Gate, PO Box 236, Reading, RG6 6AT, UK
E. Owen
Affiliation:
Department of Agriculture, The University of Reading, Earley Gate, PO Box 236, Reading, RG6 6AT, UK
C.K. Reynolds
Affiliation:
Department of Agriculture, The University of Reading, Earley Gate, PO Box 236, Reading, RG6 6AT, UK
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Extract

Non-additivity occurs when the nutritive value of a mixture of feedstuffs differs from that of the sum of its components. It is most commonly observed when one dietary constituent influences, either positively or negatively, the apparent digestibility of another under conditions where components such as nitrogen and sulphur are non-limiting. In general negative effects occur due to the depression of rumen pH or substrate competition, while positive effects have been identified when readily fermentable fibre sources such as sugar beet pulp have been included in rations containing poorly fermented forages such as cereal straw. With the increasing use of in vitro systems, not just to examine feed degradation characteristics but to derive parameters such as microbial protein yield, the following study was conducted to determine whether such interactions could be identified in vitro.

Type
Poster Presentations
Copyright
Copyright © The British Society of Animal Science 2001

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References

Mauricio, R.M., Mould, F.L., Dhanoa, M.S., Owen, E., Channa, K.S. and Theodorou, M.K. 1999. Semi-automation of the pressure transducer in vitro gas production technique for evaluating ruminant feedstuffs. Animal Feed Science and Technology, 79:321330.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mould, F.L., Mauricio, R.M. Smith, T, and Owen, E. 2000. The influence of rumen fluid pH on the rate and extent of maize silage and wheat straw degradation estimated in vitro using the Reading Pressure Technique. Proceedings BSAS 2000, Scarborough March 2000, p53.Google Scholar

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