Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Effects of protein source, formaldehyde treatment and rumen-protected methionine on the metabolism and performance of pregnant and lactating ewes fed straw

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 November 2017

D. Handford
Affiliation:
ASRC, School of Agriculture, Harper Adams University College, Edgmond, Newport, Shropshire TF10 8NB, UK
S.E. Pattinson
Affiliation:
ASRC, School of Agriculture, Harper Adams University College, Edgmond, Newport, Shropshire TF10 8NB, UK
R.G. Wilkinson
Affiliation:
ASRC, School of Agriculture, Harper Adams University College, Edgmond, Newport, Shropshire TF10 8NB, UK
L.A. Sinclair
Affiliation:
ASRC, School of Agriculture, Harper Adams University College, Edgmond, Newport, Shropshire TF10 8NB, UK
Get access

Extract

Fishmeal is a suitable protein source for pregnant and lactating ewes, providing higher levels of undegradable protein than vegetable protein sources, with an improved biological value (Robinson, 1987). Vegetable protein sources may however be improved by formaldehyde treatment to reduce protein degradability and by the addition of rumen-protected amino acids. The objective of the current experiment was to compare the effects of feeding concentrates containing fishmeal with concentrates containing soya-bean meal, formaldehyde treated soya-bean meal and formaldehyde treated soya-bean meal with rumen-protected methionine.

Type
Threatre Presentations
Copyright
Copyright © The British Society of Animal Science 2001

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Ørskov, E.R. and McDonald, I. 1979. The estimation of protein degradation in the rumen from incubation measurements weighted according to rate of passage. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 92: 499503.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Robinson, J.J. 1987. Energy and protein requirements of the ewe. In Recent Advances in Ruminant Nutrition. (eds Haresign, W. and Cole, D.J.A.), pp187204. Butterworths; London.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 1 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 20th November 2017 - 20th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-76cb886bbf-tvlwp Total loading time: 0.279 Render date: 2021-01-20T18:50:46.558Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Effects of protein source, formaldehyde treatment and rumen-protected methionine on the metabolism and performance of pregnant and lactating ewes fed straw
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Effects of protein source, formaldehyde treatment and rumen-protected methionine on the metabolism and performance of pregnant and lactating ewes fed straw
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Effects of protein source, formaldehyde treatment and rumen-protected methionine on the metabolism and performance of pregnant and lactating ewes fed straw
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *