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The effects of altering dietary fatty acid and vitamin E content on the chemical, physical and organoleptic quality of pig meat and fat

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 November 2017

C.O. Leskanich
Affiliation:
Department of Biochemical Sciences, SAC, Auchincruive, Ayr KA6 5HW, United Kingdom
K.R. Matthews
Affiliation:
Meat and Livestock Commission, Winterhill House, Snowdon Drive, Milton Keynes MK6 1AX, United Kingdom
C.C. Warkup
Affiliation:
Meat and Livestock Commission, Winterhill House, Snowdon Drive, Milton Keynes MK6 1AX, United Kingdom
R.C. Noble
Affiliation:
Department of Biochemical Sciences, SAC, Auchincruive, Ayr KA6 5HW, United Kingdom
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Extract

The tissues of animals for food use have come to be associated with a predominance of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, the result of which has been to contribute to the perceived human dietary imbalance of fatty acids. The fact that porcine tissues assume a fatty acid composition similar to that of the respective diet has enabled the composition to be altered with respect to human dietary needs (Morgan et al, 1992). The fatty acid compositions of rapeseed and fish oils are characterised by a number of factors of relevance to human health recommendations (BNF, 1992). Thus, rapeseed oil contains a low content of saturates, a moderate content of linoleic acid and a high content of α-linolenic acid whilst fish oil contains high levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Although benefiting the nutritional value of meat/fat, the feeding of increased levels of highly polyunsaturated fatty acids has the potential, in theory at least, of adversely affecting organoleptic and various physical properties. Such adverse effects could be manifested during and/or after the preparation and cooking of the meat or meat products at which times the oxidative degradation of fatty acids is maximised. The inclusion of dietary vitamin E has a range of beneficial effects on meat quality principally due to its antioxidant effects. The present experiment was an attempt to optimise the fatty acid composition of pork and pork products for human health purposes whilst not adversely affecting factors controlling consumer acceptability.

Type
Pig Meat Quality
Copyright
Copyright © The British Society of Animal Science 1996

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References

BNF, British Nutrition Foundation (1992) Unsaturated Fatty Acids - Nutritional and Physiological Significance. The Report of the British Nutrition Foundation's Task Force. Chapman & Hall, London.. 211 pp.Google ScholarPubMed
Morgan, C.A.; Noble, R.C.; Cocchi, M. and McCartney, R. (1992) Manipulation of the fatty acid composition of pig meat lipids by dietary means. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 58, 357368.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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