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Developing a method to predict body composition in mice using computerised tomography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 November 2017

M. Rampersad
Affiliation:
Scottish Agricultural College (SAC), Sir Stephen Watson Building, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian, EH26 0PH, Scotland
A. Lombardi
Affiliation:
Scottish Agricultural College (SAC), Sir Stephen Watson Building, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian, EH26 0PH, Scotland
L. Bünger
Affiliation:
Scottish Agricultural College (SAC), Sir Stephen Watson Building, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian, EH26 0PH, Scotland
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Extract

The mouse is a widely used model in experimental genetics especially for the genetic dissection of fat and lean tissue deposition in farm animals and humans (Bünger & Hill 2005). The body composition of mice has been recently measured in vivo and using carcasses with newly developed technologies and special equipment such as Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry topographic scanners, like the PIXImus series, or micro computed axial tomography scanners (Medlin 1999). These methods, although accurate, are still relatively expensive. The aim of this study was to assess whether a computerised tomography (CT) scanner designed for scanning of humans, was capable of providing sufficiently accurate estimate of the body composition of mice of different lines, to prepare the ground for studies in mice as model animals to fast-track experiments in farm animals in a cost-effective way.

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Theatre Presentations
Copyright
Copyright © The British Society of Animal Science 2005

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References

Bünger, L. and Hill, W. G., 2005. In: Eisen, E. J. (Ed.), The Mouse in Animal Genetics and Breeding Research. Imperial College Press, London. (In press)Google Scholar
Hastings, I. M. and Hill, W. G. (1989). Animal Production, 48: 229-33CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Medlin, J. F. (1999). Environmental Health Perspectives, 107 (2): A78.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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