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The Information Revolution and The Paradox of American Power

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2017

Joseph S. Nye Jr.
Affiliation:
John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University since 1995; of Defense for International Security Affairs in 1994-1995

Abstract

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Type
Meeting Report
Copyright
Copyright © American Society of International Law 2003

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References

1 This lecture draws upon my book, the Paradox of American Power (2002).

2 See Esther Dyson, Release 2.1 : A Design for Living in the Digital Age (1998).

3 See Spiro, Peter J., The New Sovereigntists: American Exceptionalism and its False Prophets, 79 Foreign Aff. 9 (2000)CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

4 Ruggie, John G., Territoriality and Beyond: Problematizing Modernity in International Relations, 47 Int’l Org. 139, 143, 155 (1993)CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

5 See Perrritt, Henry H. Jr., The Internet as a Threat to Sovereignty? Thoughts on the Internet ‘s Role in Strengthening National and Global Governance, 5 Ind. J. Global Legal Stud. 423, 427 (1998)Google Scholar.

6 Sassen, Saskia, On the Internet and Sovereignty, 5 Ind. J. Global Legal Stud. 545, 548 (1998)Google Scholar.

7 Quinlan, Joseph & Chandler, Marc, The U.S. Trade Deficit: A Dangerous Obsession, 80 Foreign Aff. 87, 92, 95 (2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

8 Hendryk Spruyt, The Sovereign State and its Competitors: An Analysis of Systems (1994).

9 See U S. Comm’n on Nat’l Sec. in the Twenty-first Century, Road Map for National Security Imperative for Change (Feb. 15, 2001) ch. 1, available at <http://www.nssg.gov/PhaseIIIFR.pdf>.

10 Adams, Sesames, Virtual Defense, 80 Foreign Aff. 98 (2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

11 Adam Roberts, The So-called ‘Right’ of Humanitarian Intervention, Trinity College Paper No. 13 (2000) at 14-16, availabk at <http://www.trinity.unimelb.edu.au/publications/papers/TP_13.pdf>.

12 See Harold Guetzkow, Multiple Loyalties: Theoretical Approach to a problem in International Organization (1955).

13 See Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism (1991).

14 Pippa Norms, the Digital Divide: Civic Engagement, Information Poverty, and the Internet World wide 191 (2001).

15 Id. at 190-91.

16 James Rosenau, Along the Domestic-Foreign Frontier: Exploring Governance in a Turbulent World 99-116 (1997).

17 Josef Joffe, America the Inescapable, N.Y. Times Mag., June 8, 1997, at 38.

18 A recent example can be found in German Marshall Fund, Transatlantic Trends 2003 Topline Data 21 (2003), available at <http://www.transatlanuctrends.org>.

19 United States Commission on National Security/21 St Century, Road Map for National Security: Imperative for Change 4 (2001), available at <http;//www.nssg.gov/PhaseIIIFR.pdf>.

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