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CLOUD STORAGE FACILITY AS A FLUID QUEUE CONTROLLED BY MARKOVIAN QUEUE

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 December 2020

A. H. El-Baz
Affiliation:
Department of Computer Science, Faculty of Computers and Information, Damietta University, New Damietta, Egypt E-mail: elbaz@du.edu.eg
A. M. K. Tarabia
Affiliation:
Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta, Egypt
A. M. Darwiesh
Affiliation:
Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta, Egypt

Abstract

Cloud storage faces many problems in the storage process which badly affect the system's efficiency. One of the most problems is insufficient buffer space in cloud storage. This means that the packets of data wait to have storage service which may lead to weakness in performance evaluation of the system. The storage process is considered a stochastic process in which we can determine the probability distribution of the buffer occupancy and the buffer content and predict the performance behavior of the system at any time. This paper modulates a cloud storage facility as a fluid queue controlled by Markovian queue. This queue has infinite buffer capacity which determined by the M/M/1/N queue with constant arrival and service rates. We obtain the analytical solution of the distribution of the buffer occupancy. Moreover, several performance measures and numerical results are given which illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed model.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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