Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Patients' perceptions of changing professional boundaries and the future of ‘nurse-led’ services

  • Alison Chapple (a1), Anne Rogers (a1), Wendy Macdonald (a1) and Michelle Sergison (a1)

Abstract

Nurses are increasingly being employed instead of doctors in some areas of work. This article examines this phenomenon in relation to a ‘nurse-led’ Personal Medical Services Primary Care Act pilot scheme. As part of an evaluative project, we examined the way in which patients understood and constructed nursing roles in the context of their use of primary care services in a socially deprived area. Whilst professional roles are established to some extent as the result of negotiation between and within professions and with government policymakers, patients' perceptions also affect whether or not changes are accepted, and the extent to which new roles gain legitimacy. Our evaluation took the form of a case study with questionnaires, in-depth interviews and observations. This particular paper is based mainly on data obtained from interviews with patients who had experienced the nurse-led service. The results showed that some patients attributed high status to the nurse by emphasizing that the nurse leading the practice was highly qualified, and other patients reconstructed the role and thought of the nurse as a doctor. This latter interpretation was derived from the patients' descriptions of core activities such as diagnosis and treatment, and other factors such as an absence of uniform. However, the most important factor that affected whether or not patients accepted a ‘nurse-led service’ related to the way in which the service met their needs. This seemed to be more important than perceptions of professional identity. The nurse-led service continued to provide the social support and continuity of care that the patients valued, and which had been provided by their previous general practitioner. The provision of these aspects of care appeared to be more important than whether or not the service was nurse-led or doctor-led. It is important to consider patients' perceptions of policy innovation when establishing new services.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Patients' perceptions of changing professional boundaries and the future of ‘nurse-led’ services
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Patients' perceptions of changing professional boundaries and the future of ‘nurse-led’ services
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Patients' perceptions of changing professional boundaries and the future of ‘nurse-led’ services
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Address for correspondence: Alison Chapple, The National Primary Care Research and Development Centre, 5th Floor, Williamson Building, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Primary Health Care Research & Development
  • ISSN: 1463-4236
  • EISSN: 1477-1128
  • URL: /core/journals/primary-health-care-research-and-development
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed