Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Building capacity in primary care: the implementation of a novel ‘Pharmacy First’ scheme for the management of UTI, impetigo and COPD exacerbation

  • Fiona Stewart (a1), Gail Caldwell (a2), Kirstin Cassells (a3), Jonathan Burton (a4) and Anne Watson (a5)...

Abstract

Aim

This service aimed to improve patient access to treatment for urinary tract infections (UTI), impetigo and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and relieve pressure on general practice and out of hours services.

Background

In 2016, a service (Pharmacy First) was introduced in Forth Valley for the management of UTI, impetigo and exacerbation of COPD using patient group directions in community pharmacies. Trained pharmacists supplied a limited range of prescription medicines. Pathways for GP referral were defined. After 5 months of implementation, the service was evaluated.

Methods

A quantitative evaluation was undertaken. Feedback was sought from patients, GPs, pharmacists and GP reception staff, using structured questionnaires. Pharmacy records were used to assess referrals and pharmacy data summarised the number and type of consultations. Basic cost data was obtained from the Health Board.

Findings

In all, 75 pharmacies (of 76), and all 55 GP practices in the area, participated in the service. Over a 5-month period, 1189 cases were managed, the majority being for UTI (75.4%) followed by impetigo (15.2%), then COPD (9.3%). Of all cases, 77.9% were prescribed medication by the pharmacist, 9.1% were given advice only and 16.7% were referred to the GP. Independent clinical assessment of a random sample of 30 GP referrals considered all to be ‘appropriate’. Feedback was received from 69 pharmacists, 34 GPs, 54 reception staff and 73 patients. Patients were very satisfied with the service, most frequently citing the ‘quick and efficient’ access to treatment, and a ‘professional service’. Two thirds of GPs (67%) and 59% of reception staff found the service useful, mainly because it reduced pressure on GP appointments. A further cost benefit evaluation would allow objective assessment of the value of this service.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Building capacity in primary care: the implementation of a novel ‘Pharmacy First’ scheme for the management of UTI, impetigo and COPD exacerbation
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Building capacity in primary care: the implementation of a novel ‘Pharmacy First’ scheme for the management of UTI, impetigo and COPD exacerbation
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Building capacity in primary care: the implementation of a novel ‘Pharmacy First’ scheme for the management of UTI, impetigo and COPD exacerbation
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence to: Fiona Stewart, Associate Postgraduate Dean, NHS Education for Scotland, Formerly NHS Forth Valley, 3rd Floor, 2 Central Quay 89 Hydepark Street, Glasgow G3 8BW, Scotland. Email: fiona.stewart@nes.scot.nhs.uk

References

Hide All
Bissell, P., Savage, I. and Anderson, C. 2006: A qualitative study of pharmacists’ perspectives on the supply of emergency hormonal contraception via patient group direction in the UK. Contraception 73, 265270.
CWFI 2014: In depth review of the general practitioner workforce. Retrieved from www.cfwi.org.uk.
Famiyeh, I.M. and McCarthy, L. 2017: Pharmacist prescribing: a scoping review about the views and experiences of patients and the public. Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy 13, 116.
Gerard, K., Tinelli, M., Latter, S., Blenkinsopp, A. and Smith, A. 2012: Valuing the extended role of prescribing pharmacist in general practice: results from a discrete choice experiment. Value in Health 15, 699707.
Information Service Division (ISD) 2016: Primary Care Workforce Survey Scotland 2015: a survey of Scottish general practices and general practice out of hours services publication. Retrieved 18 January 2017 from http://www.isdscotland.org/Health-Topics/General-Practice/Publications/2016-06-14/2016-06-14-PrimaryCareWorkforceSurveyScotland2015-Summary.pdf.
Joint Statement RPS (Scotland) RCGP (Scotland) 2011: Breaking down barriers: how pharmacists and general practitioners can work together to improve patient care. Retrieved 18 January 2017 from https://www.rpharms.com/scottish-pharmacy-board-pdfs/breaking-down-the-barriers-final-200120926.pdf.
Latif, A., Waring, J., Watmough, D., Barber, N., Chuter, A., Davies, J., Salema, N.E., Boyd, M.J. and Elliott, R.A. 2016: Examination of England’s new medicine service (NMS) of complex health care interventions in community pharmacy. Research in Social Administrative Pharmacy 12, 966989.
NICE 2013: Patient Group Directions: Medicines Practice Guideline (MPG2). Retrieved 12 December 2016 from https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/mpg2.
Paudyal, V., Hansford, D., Cunningham, S. and Stewart, D. 2010: Cross-sectional survey of community pharmacists’ views of the electronic minor ailment service in Scotland. International Journal of Pharmacy Practice 18, 194201.
Porteous, T., Ryan, M., Bond, C., Watson, M. and Watson, V. 2016: Managing minor ailments; the public’s preferences for attributes of community pharmacies. A discrete choice experiment. PLoS One 31, e0152257.
RPSGB 2015: Website statement. Retrieved 18 January 2017 from http://www.rpharms.com/our-campaigns/pharmacists-and-gp-surgeries.asp.
Scottish Government 2017: Achieving excellence in pharmaceutical care launched August 2017. Retrieved 18 January 2017 from http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/08/4589/0.
Smith, J., Holder, H., Edwards, N., Jo Maybin, J., Parker, H., Rosen, R., Walsh, N. 2013: Securing the future of general practice: new models of primary care. London: The Kings Fund and Nuffield Trust.
Stewart, D.C., Maclure, K., Bond, C., Cunningham, S., Diack, L., George, J. and McCaig, D.J. 2011: Pharmacist prescribing in primary care: the views of patients across Great Britain who had experienced the service. International Journal of Pharmacy Practice 19, 328332.
Tinelli, M., Blenkinsopp, A., Latter, S., Smith, A. and Chapman, S.R. 2015: Survey of patients’ experiences and perceptions of care provided by nurse and pharmacist independent prescribers in primary care. Health Expectations 18, 12411255.

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed