Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Using Clinically Based Vignettes to Further Develop a Mass Gathering Triage Tool

  • Jamie Ranse (a1) (a2), Matt Cannon (a3), Rebecca Roitman (a4) and Julia Morphet (a5)

Abstract

Introduction:

This research builds on a previously developed triage: Mass Gathering Triage Scale (MaGaTT) by Cannon, et al (2017). This tool was targeted towards non-health care professional first responders within mass-gathering events (MGEs). However, this tool had not been evaluated.

Aim:

To further develop the previously designed MaGaTT using vignettes of clinical cases to: 1) determine variation in decision-making, and 2) inform further tool development prior to real-world testing.

Methods:

Volunteer members of St. John Ambulance Australia were surveyed using 18 vignettes of de-identified real patient record forms from MGEs covered by St. John Ambulance Australia (NSW) in 2013-2014. Participants were given the MaGaTT and written instructions on its use. Participants triaged 18 patients, recording their decisions on the online survey. Responses against the vignettes were analyzed using Fleiss Kappa [p-bar] measure. A score of 0.61 – 0.8 represented substantial agreement and a score of between 0.41 and 0.6 represented moderate agreement between participants.

Results:

There were 110 completed responses. The majority of participants were male (n =66, 60%), having completed a Bachelor’s Degree (n =38, 34.5%), and holding the clinical skill level of “first responder” (n=42, 38.2%). The overall agreement [p-bar] for the 18 items was moderate at 0.55. When examined by triage category, the “Resuscitation” category had substantial agreement (0.69), when compared with moderate agreement for “Urgent” (0.52) and “Minor” (0.52) categories.

Discussion:

This research demonstrates that the MaGaTT can be used with moderate agreement, and substantial agreement within the resuscitation category. This is similar to triage tools internationally, where high levels of agreement relate to triage categories for patients requiring resuscitation when compared to patients requiring lower levels of clinical care. Slight changes have been made to the original MaGaTT as a result of this research.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Using Clinically Based Vignettes to Further Develop a Mass Gathering Triage Tool
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Using Clinically Based Vignettes to Further Develop a Mass Gathering Triage Tool
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Using Clinically Based Vignettes to Further Develop a Mass Gathering Triage Tool
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Using Clinically Based Vignettes to Further Develop a Mass Gathering Triage Tool

  • Jamie Ranse (a1) (a2), Matt Cannon (a3), Rebecca Roitman (a4) and Julia Morphet (a5)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed