Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Relationship Between Battery Capacity and the Delivery of Shocks in Prehospital Defibrillators

  • Mark J. Cleland (a1), Justin P. Maloney (a2), James L. Hay (a1) and Brian H. Rowe (a3)

Abstract

Study Objective:

Automatic external defibrillators (AED) have enabled the medical act of defibrillation to be performed in the community by a number of non-physician providers. However, these portable, battery-powered units are costly to maintain and service. This study examines the life of AED batteries and provides a battery replacement protocol.

Design:

Prospective diagnostic testing of 191 field batteries to determine their ability to deliver shocks at 360 joule.

Setting:

Ottawa General Hospital Paramedic Program.

Outcomes:

Using a battery analyzer, battery capacity and the number of shocks delivered were determined for each battery (at room temperature and in a controlled, refrigerated setting). In addition, the reliability of the testing method was assessed using the interclass correlation coefficient (ICC).

Results:

High reliability of blinded technical assessment of the batteries was achieved (ICC = 0.85). A strong correlation between the battery's capacity and the number of shocks it can deliver was obtained. For example, a battery with a measured capacity of 75% is capable of delivering more than 30 consecutive 360 joule shocks. This compares to a battery with a capacity of 20%, which is capable of delivering only 12 consecutive 360 joule shocks.

Conclusion:

While manufacturers' recommendations on battery replacement always have been based on an assumed technical threshold, these recommendations are not based on individual battery performance. The system for testing batteries described in this paper, should provide significant cost savings and improve quality assurance within a prehospital AED program.

Copyright

Corresponding author

Ottawa General Hospital, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, K1H 8L6Canada

References

Hide All
1. Shenoy, DG, Hughes, JD: The battery enigma: Are third party rechargeable batteries as good as OEMS'. Biomedical Instrumentation & Technology July/August 1995:299305.
2. Cummins, RO, Chesemore, K, White, RD et al. : Defibrillator failures. JAMA 1990;264:8:10191025.
3. ECRI: Replacing rechargeable batteries. Technology for Anesthesia 1995;15:12:12.
4. Laerdal Medical Corporation: Laerdal Medical Technical Manual. April 1988.
5. Matsushita Electric of Canada, Ltd., Panasonic Industrial Division: Sealed Lead-acid Batteries Technical Handbook. 1993.
6. White, RD: Maintenance of defibrillators in a state of readiness. Ann Emerg Med 1993;22(Part 2):302306.

Keywords

Relationship Between Battery Capacity and the Delivery of Shocks in Prehospital Defibrillators

  • Mark J. Cleland (a1), Justin P. Maloney (a2), James L. Hay (a1) and Brian H. Rowe (a3)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed