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Medical Relief Personnel in Complex Emergencies: Perceptions of Effectiveness in the Former Yugoslavia

  • Michael J. VanRooyen (a1), M. James Eliades (a1), Jurek G. Grabowski (a1), M.E. Stress (a2), Josip Juric (a3) and Frederick M. Burkle (a1)...

Abstract

Humanitarian medical assistance and intervention during the civil war in Bosnia and Croatia was felt by national health workers to be relatively ineffective (2.8 on a 5-point Likert scale), compared to other forms of humanitarian assistance such as medical supplies (4.4/5) and non-medical materials (3.9/5). Bosnian physicians treating civilians noted that the most helpful types of personnel were surgeons and emergency physicians. This study suggests that assessment of personnel needs at the recipient level, in addition to standard relief assessments, is required early in models of complex emergencies. This study supports existing epidemiological models of complex emergencies, especially when high trauma-related mortality and morbidity are likely to occur.

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Corresponding author

Center for International Emergency, Disaster and Refugee Studies, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1830 E. Monument St., Suite 6-100, Baltimore, MD 21287 USA, E-mail: mvanrooy@jhmi.edu

References

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Keywords

Medical Relief Personnel in Complex Emergencies: Perceptions of Effectiveness in the Former Yugoslavia

  • Michael J. VanRooyen (a1), M. James Eliades (a1), Jurek G. Grabowski (a1), M.E. Stress (a2), Josip Juric (a3) and Frederick M. Burkle (a1)...

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