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Effects Of The Video Case Study in Preparing Paramedic Preceptors For The Role Of Evaluator

  • Judy Janing (a1) and Wesley Sime (a2)

Abstract

Introduction:

Accurate field evaluations are critical in determining paramedic students' competency to provide patient care. The [U.S.] National Paramedic Curriculum does not address the skills needed by evaluators, and requirements to be a preceptor/evaluator vary from state to state. Therefore, it is imperative that educational programs develop an evaluation process that reflects valid performance criteria and assure a high degree of rating consistency among the evaluators. This study sought to determine the effects of using a video case based teaching approach in preparing paramedic preceptors for the role of evaluator.

Hypothesis:

Paramedic preceptors receiving the case-based teaching approach to prepare them for the role of evaluator would demonstrate significantly higher scores on a video posttest than paramedic preceptors who were not prepared for the role of evaluator using the case-based approach.

Methods:

Thirty-four paramedic preceptors from a Midwestern fire-based Emergency Medical Services system were enrolled in this study. Two scripted video student/patient encounters were used to measure evaluation scores in a pretest-posttest comparison of control versus experimental group. The experimental group was given structured rating guidelines and practice applying those guidelines to a case study. Pretest and posttest scores were weighted and analyzed using Analysis of Variance.

Results:

Analysis of the pretest–posttest differences revealed significantly higher scores for the experimental group in the categories containing complex behaviors: communication F(1,16) = 13.21, p <.01, assessment F (1,16) = 8.81, p <.01, and knowledge F (1,16) = 29.64, p <.001. There was no significant difference between groups in the categories containing simple, easily observed behaviors: reliability F (1,16) = .55, p >.05 and cooperativeness F (1,16) = 3.02, p >.05.

Conclusions:

Using the case study method and written guidelines that provide concrete examples of complex behaviors appears to increase reliability of evaluations among preceptors.

Introducción:

Las evaluaciones veraces de campo son criticas para determinar la competencia de estudiantes paramédicos para proveer cuidado a los pacientes. El Currículum Paramédico Nacional no contempla las destrezas necesarias para evaluadores, y los requerimientos para ser preceptor/evaluador varia de Estado a Estado. Por lo tanto, es imperativo que programas educacionales desarrollen un proceso de evaluación que refleje criterios validos de actuación y aseguren un alto grado de consistencia entre los evaluadores. Este estudio busca determinar los efectos de usar un video-caso basado en un enfoque para preparar preceptores paramédicos para el papel de evaluadores.

Hipótesis:

Los preceptores paramédicos que reciban el enfoque de enseñanza basada en casos para prepararlos en el papel de evaluadores, deberán demostrar puntuaciones significativamente mas altas en un video post-examen, que los preceptores paramédicos quienes no fueron preparados para el papel de evaluadores utilizando el enfoque basado en casos.

Métodos:

Treinta y cuatro preceptores paramédicos de una base de bomberos del Sistema de Servicios Médicos de Emergencia del Medio-oeste, fueron enrolados en este estudio. Dos videos con guión de encuentro estudiante / paciente fueron utilizados para medir y evaluar la puntuación en examen pre y post, comparado contra el grupo experimental de control. Al grupo experimental se le dieron rangos, guías y practicas aplicando aquellas del estudio de caso. La puntuación pre y post examen file balanceada y analizada utilizando ANOVA.

Resultados:

El análisis de las diferencias pre y post examen revelaron puntuaciones significativamente mas altos para el grupo experimental in las categorías conteniendo comportamientos complejos: comunicación F(1,16) = 13.21, p <.01,calculo F(1,16) = 8.81, p <.01, y conociendo F(1,16) = 29.64, p <.001. No existió diferencia significativa entre grupos de las categorías conteniendo comportamientos simples y fácilmente observables: fiabilidad F(1,16) = 3.02, p >.05.

Copyright

Corresponding author

3312 N. 78th St., Omaha, NE 68134, Email: jjaning@home.net

References

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Keywords

Effects Of The Video Case Study in Preparing Paramedic Preceptors For The Role Of Evaluator

  • Judy Janing (a1) and Wesley Sime (a2)

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