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Terrorism in Taiwan, Republic of China

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 June 2012

Ming-Che Tsai
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China
Chia-Chang Chuang
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China
Jeffrey Arnold
Affiliation:
Medical Director, Yale New-Haven Center for Emergency and Terrorism Preparedness, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
Mau-Hwa Lee
Affiliation:
Bureau of Medical Affairs, Department of Health, Taiwan, Republic of China
Sun-Chieh Hsu
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China
Chih-Hsien Chi
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The Republic of China on the island of Taiwan has experienced at least 20 terrorist events since 1979, including 13 aircraft hijackings and five bombings. Factors responsible for the relatively small burden of terrorism on Taiwan in the past include tight military control over political dissent until 1987, a warming relationship with the People's Republic of China in the 1990s, political inclusion of major internal cultural groups, geographic isolation, and a lack of other significant international enemies. Nevertheless, today Taiwan faces a new prospect of terrorism by adversaries of the United States and its allies and by an international paradigm shift in the types of weapons used by terrorists.

National emergency management has been enhanced significantly since the Ji Ji earthquake in 1999, including the assignment of lead government agencies to the planning and preparedness for specific types of terrorist events involving nuclear, biological, and/or chemical releases. Other significant improvements at the operations level, include the establishment of two national disaster medical assistance teams, four urban search and rescue teams, 13 local disaster medical assistance teams, and eight chemical emergency response hospitals. Future challenges include improving the coordination of inter-agency response at the national level and the quantity and quality of local disaster response assets.

Type
Special Reports
Copyright
Copyright © World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine 2003

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References

1. Grolier Academic Encyclopedia 1988; 19:1213.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2. United Daily News Data Bank Web site. Available at: http://www.udndata.com.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Chiu, WT, Arnold, J, Huang, W, Chiu, CH. Survey of international search and rescue teams after the Ji Ji earthquake in Taiwan. Ann Emerg Med 2001; 37(6):733774.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4. Department of Fire. Ji Ji Earthquake: Federal Response Survey Report. Taipei, Taiwan: Ministry of the Interior. 1999.Google Scholar

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