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Online Victim Tracking and Tracing System (ViTTS) for Major Incident Casualties

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 May 2013

Geertruid M.H. Marres*
Affiliation:
Major Incident Hospital and Trauma Centre of the University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands
Luc Taal
Affiliation:
Major Incident Hospital and Trauma Centre of the University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands
Michael Bemelman
Affiliation:
Major Incident Hospital and Trauma Centre of the University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands
Jos Bouman
Affiliation:
Major Incident Hospital and Trauma Centre of the University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands
Luke P.H. Leenen
Affiliation:
Major Incident Hospital and Trauma Centre of the University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands
*
Correspondence: Geertruid M.H. Marres, MD Department of Surgery and Trauma University Medical Centre Utrecht Heidelberglaan 100 3584 CX, Utrecht, the Netherlands E-mail gmarres@hotmail.com

Abstract

Introduction

Dealing with major incidents requires an immediate and coordinated response by multiple organizations. Communicating and coordinating over multiple geographical locations and organizations is a complex process. One of the greatest challenges is patient tracking and tracing. Often, data about the number of victims, their condition, location and transport is lacking. This hinders an effective response and causes public distress. To address this problem, a Victim Tracing and Tracking system (ViTTS) was developed.

Methods

An online ViTTS was developed based on a wireless network with routers on ambulances, and direct online registration of victims and their triage data through barcode injury cards. The system was tested for feasibility and usability during disaster drills.

Results

The formation of a local radio network of hotspots with mobile routers and connection over General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) to the central database worked well. ViTTS produced accurately stored data, real-time availability, and a real-time overview of the patients (number, seriousness of injury, and location).

Conclusion

The ViTTS provides a system for early, unique registration of victims close to the impact site. Online application and connection of the various systems used by the different chains in disaster relief promotes interoperability and enables patient tracking and tracing. It offers a real-time overview of victims to all involved disaster relief partners, which is necessary to generate an adequate disaster response.

MarresGMH, TaalL, BemelmanM, BoumanJ, LeenenLPH. Online Victim Tracking and Tracing System (ViTTS) for Major Incident Casualties. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2013;28(4):1-9.

Type
Special Report
Copyright
Copyright © World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine 2013 

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