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Health Tracking for Improved Humanitarian Performance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 June 2012

Nancy Mock
Affiliation:
Associate Professor, Department of International Health and Development, Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and Payson Center for International Development, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA Executive Director, Recovery Action Learning Laboratory, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Richard Garfield
Affiliation:
Professor of Clinical International Nursing, Columbia University School of Nursing, New York, New York, USA
Corresponding

Abstract

Presently, there is no shortage of methods for collecting data on populations requiring assistance from humanitarian health interventions. However, utilizing a working group, the authors of this paper have looked at these methods through a critical lens and found that there is need for improvement upon existing systems of data collection and analysis. The authors concluded that efforts to standardize the methods of data collection are needed to achieve universal uniformity, and that more funding should be allocated to analyze the data collected.

Type
Special Report
Copyright
Copyright © World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine 2007

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