Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

37. Mechanism of Injury is Not a Factor in Prehospital Clinical Evaluation of Potential Spine Injury

  • Robert M. Domeier (a1), Rawden W. Evans (a1), Robert A. Swor (a2), J. Brian Hancock (a3), William Fales (a4), Jon Krohmer (a5) and Shirley M Frederiksen (a1)...

Extract

Objective: Traditional EMS teaching identifies mechanism of injury as an important predictor of spine injury. Clinical criteria to select patients for immobilization are being studied in Michigan and have been implemented in Maine. Maine requires automatic immobilization of patients with “a positive mechanism” clearly capable of producing spine injury. The purpose of this study is to determine if mechanism of injury effects the ability of clinical criteria to select patients with spine injury.

Design: Multicenter Prospective Cohort.

Methods: EMS personnel completed a check-off data sheet on out-of-hospital spine immobilized patients. Data included mechanism of injury and yes/no determinations of the clinical criteria: altered mental status, neurologic deficit, evidence of intoxication, spinal pain or tenderness, and suspected extremity fracture. Hospital outcome data included confirmation of spine injury and treatment required. Mechanisms of injury were tabulated and rates of spine injury for each mechanism was calculated. The patients were divided into high-risk and low-risk groups.

Results: Data was collected on 6,500 patients. There were 213 (3.3%) patients with spine injuries identified. There were 1,065 patients with 100 (9.4%) injuries in the high-risk mechanism group, and 5435 patients with 113 (2%) injuries in the low-risk group. Clinical criteria identified 96 of 100 (96%) injuries in the high risk mechanism group and 106 of 113 (94%) in the low-risk group.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      37. Mechanism of Injury is Not a Factor in Prehospital Clinical Evaluation of Potential Spine Injury
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      37. Mechanism of Injury is Not a Factor in Prehospital Clinical Evaluation of Potential Spine Injury
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      37. Mechanism of Injury is Not a Factor in Prehospital Clinical Evaluation of Potential Spine Injury
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed