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2018 Natural Disaster Response in Japan

  • Hisayoshi Kondo (a1), Yuichi Koido (a1), Hirotaka Uesgi (a1), Yoshitaka Kohayagawa (a1), Ayako Takahashi (a1), Yuzuru Kawashima (a1), Miho Misaki (a1), Kayako Chishima (a1) and Yoshiki Toyokuni (a1)...

Abstract

Introduction:

Japan experienced several major disasters in 2018.

Aim:

Evaluation of medical response was conducted and problems determined to solve for future response.

Methods:

An evaluation conducted on DMAT responding report of Northern Osaka Earthquake, West Japan Torrential Rain Disaster, Typhoon Jebi, and Hokkaido Iburi East Earthquake.

Results:

DMAT responded 58 teams for Osaka Northern Earthquake, 119 teams for West Japan Torrential Rain Disaster, 17 teams for Typhoon Jebi, 67 teams for Hokkaido Iburi East Earthquake. At the Osaka Northern Earthquake, by comparing the report of seismic diagnosis, results and, a magnitude of each region, hospital damage was evaluated. At the West Japan Torrential Rain Disaster, a flood hazard map was used to expect inundation at hospitals. At the Hokkaido Iburi East Earthquake, information of hospital generator was gathered and planned assistance for loss of power. Water supply cessation in the West Japan Torrential Rain Disaster and loss of power in the Hokkaido Iburi East Earthquake influenced hospital functionality. More precise preparation for hospital management in the event of a loss of power and water supply situation required in not only in local government but also each hospital. For the West Japan Torrential Rain Disaster, we experienced the same type of major disasters in the past, but could not manage accordingly. For the Hokkaido Iburi East Earthquake, we applied what was learned from the West Japan Torrential Rain Disaster.

Discussion:

Disaster medical operation was supposed to be managed with information from the Emergency Medical Information System (EMIS). However, 2018 disasters provided lessons that require a full understanding of disaster prior information and expected disaster damage information to manage disaster assistance. To accomplish effective disaster assistance, information must be gathered of supplies and assistance required by hospitals. An effective system to facilitate lessons learned needs to be developed

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2018 Natural Disaster Response in Japan

  • Hisayoshi Kondo (a1), Yuichi Koido (a1), Hirotaka Uesgi (a1), Yoshitaka Kohayagawa (a1), Ayako Takahashi (a1), Yuzuru Kawashima (a1), Miho Misaki (a1), Kayako Chishima (a1) and Yoshiki Toyokuni (a1)...

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