Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-sbc4w Total loading time: 0.304 Render date: 2021-03-08T07:29:39.282Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Thermally-induced stresses in thin aluminum layers grown on silicon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 March 2012

E. Eiper
Affiliation:
Erich Schmid Institute for Material Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences and Institute for Metal Physics, University Leoben, Austria, Institute of Solid State Physics, Graz University of Technology, Austria
R. Resel
Affiliation:
Institute of Solid State Physics, Graz University of Technology, Austria
C. Eisenmenger-Sittner
Affiliation:
Institute of Solid State Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Austria
M. Hafok
Affiliation:
Erich Schmid Institute for Material Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences and Institute for Metal Physics, University Leoben, Austria, Materials Center Leoben, University Leoben, Austria
J. Keckes
Affiliation:
Erich Schmid Institute for Material Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences and Institute for Metal Physics, University Leoben, Austria, Materials Center Leoben, University Leoben, Austria
Corresponding

Abstract

Elevated-temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to evaluate residual stresses in aluminum thin films on Si(100). The films with a thickness of 2 μm were deposited by magnetron sputtering at different temperatures, and XRD measurements were carried out with the heating stage DHS 900 mounted on a Seifert 3000 PTS diffractometer. The strains were characterized always in temperature cycles from room temperature up to 450 °C with steps of 50 °C. Stress values in weakly textured thin films were calculated using the Hill model, applying temperature-dependent X-ray elastic constants of aluminum. The thin films exhibit specific temperature hysteresis of stresses depending on the deposition temperature (being from the range of 50 °C–300 °C). The results allow us to quantify contributions of intrinsic and extrinsic stresses to the total stress in the layers as well as to evaluate phenomena related to plastic yield. The comparison of the data from thin films deposited at different temperatures indicate a dependence of intrinsic stresses on the substrate temperature during deposition as well as the presence of the plastic yield in films during the cool-down after deposition

Type
Technical Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2004

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Atar, E., Sarioglu, C., Demirler, U., Sabri Kayali, E., and Cimenoglu, H. (2002). Scr. Mater. SCMAF7 48, 13311336. scz, SCMAF7 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Callister, W. D. Jr. (1999). Materials Science and Engineering: An Introduction, 5th ed. (Wiley, New York).Google Scholar
Chidambarrao, D., Rodbell, I. P., Thouless, E. M. D., and DeHaven, P. W. (1994). Materials Reliability in Microelectronics (IV), Symposium, pp. 261–268.Google Scholar
Eiper, E., Thesis, University of Technology, Graz-Austria, January 2003.Google Scholar
King, H. W., Ferguson, S. H., Gursan, S., and Yildiz, M. (2002). Adv. X-Ray Anal. AXRAAA 45, 232237. axr, AXRAAA Google Scholar
Kraft, O., Hommel, M., and Arzt, E. (2000). Mater. Sci. Eng., A MSAPE3 288, 209216. msa, MSAPE3 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kuschke, W. M.and Arzt, E. (1994). Appl. Phys. Lett. APPLAB 64, 10971099. apl, APPLAB CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lee, S.-H., Bravman, J. C., Doan, J. C., Lee, S., and Marieb, T. N. (2002). J. Appl. Phys. JAPIAU 91, 6. jap, JAPIAU Google Scholar
Lide, D. R. (1995–1996). Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 76th ed., Vol. 12, p. 190.Google Scholar
Ma, C. H., Huang, J.-H., and Chen, H. (2002). Thin Solid Films THSFAP 418, 7378. tsf, THSFAP CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nix, W. D. (1989). Metall. Trans. A MTTABN 20A, 2217. mta, MTTABN CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Resel, R., Tamas, E., Sonderegger, B., Hofbauer, P., and Keckes, J. (2003). J. Appl. Crystallogr. JACGAR 36, 8085. acr, JACGAR CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thouless, M. D. (1993). Acta Metall. Mater. AMATEB 41, 10571064. amm, AMATEB CrossRefGoogle Scholar
van Houtta, P.and de Byser, L. (1993). Acta Metall. Mater. AMATEB 41, 2. amm, AMATEB Google Scholar
van Leauwen, M., Kamminga, J.-D., and Mittermeijer, E. J. (1999). J. Appl. Phys. JAPIAU 86, 4. jap, JAPIAU Google Scholar
Venkatraman, R.and Bravmann, J. C. (1992). J. Mater. Res. JMREEE 7, 20402048. jmr, JMREEE CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vook, R. W.and Wirr, F. (1965). J. Appl. Phys. JAPIAU 36, 7. jap, JAPIAU CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zhan, Z. B., Hershberger, J., Yalisove, S. M., and Billelo, J. C. (2002). Thin Solid Films THSFAP 415, 21,31. tsf, THSFAP Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 5
Total number of PDF views: 14 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 8th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Thermally-induced stresses in thin aluminum layers grown on silicon
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Thermally-induced stresses in thin aluminum layers grown on silicon
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Thermally-induced stresses in thin aluminum layers grown on silicon
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *