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Biological Warfare and the Third World

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 May 2016

Raymond A. Zilinskas
Affiliation:
Center for Public Issues in Biotechnology, Maryland Biotechnology Institute, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Catonsville, MD 21228
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Abstract

This article analyses the accomplishments and shortcomings of the 1972 Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention and recent attempts to strengthen it. It examines why developing countries show little interest in these efforts. Neither do they seem intent on acquiring this weapons system. Might this situation change? To find out, the article examines past thrid world conflicts, focusing especially on those where chemical weapons have seen use. The lessons from the past are applied to assess the possibility of a country acquiring, then employing biological weapons in future conflicts as an adjunct to, or instead of, chemical arms. Finally, suggestions are made as to possible steps that the international community can take to lessen the threat of biological warfare generally and to involve third world countries in the on-going attempts to strengthen the Convention.

Type
Articles and Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Association for Politics and the Life Sciences 

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