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Historical Disparities and Gendered Citation Patterns

  • David A. M. Peterson (a1)

Abstract

In this comment on Dion, Sumner, and Mitchell’s article “Gendered Citation Patterns across Political Science and Social Science Methodology Fields,” I explore the role of changes in the disparities of citations to work written by women over time. Breaking down their citation data by era, I find that some of the patterns in citations are the result of the legacy of disparity in the field. Citations to more recent work come closer to matching the distribution of the gender of authors of published work. Although the need for more equitable practices of citation remains, the overall patterns are not quite as bad as Dion, Sumner, and Mitchell conclude.

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Footnotes

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Contributing Editor: Jeff Gill

Footnotes

References

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Berelson, B. R., Lazarsfeld, P. F., and McPhee, W. N.. 1954. Voting: A study of opinion formation in a presidential campaign . Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
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Lazarsfeld, P. F., Berelson, B. R., and Gaudet, H.. 1948. People’s choice: How the voter makes up his mind in a presidential campaign . 1st edn. New York: Columbia University Press.
Mitchell, S. M., and Hesli, V. L.. 2013. Women don’t ask? Women don’t say no? Bargaining and service in the political science profession. PS: Political Science & Politics 46(2):355369.
Peterson, D. A. 2018. Author gender and editorial outcomes at political behavior. PS: Political Science & Politics 51(S1), forthcoming.
Sumner, J. L. 2018. The gender balance assessment tool (gbat): A web-based tool for estimating gender balance in syllabi and bibliographies. PS: Political Science & Politics 51(2):396400.
Teele, D. L., and Thelen, K.. 2017. Gender in the journals: Publication patterns in political science. PS: Political Science & Politics 50(2):433447.
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Historical Disparities and Gendered Citation Patterns

  • David A. M. Peterson (a1)

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