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QTL mapping for the number of branches and pods using wild chromosome segment substitution lines in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 July 2014

Qingyuan He
Affiliation:
Soybean Research Institute, National Center for Soybean Improvement, MOA Key Laboratory for Biology and Genetic Improvement of Soybean (General), National Key Laboratory for Crop Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210095, People's Republic of China Life Science College of Anhui Science and Technology University, Fengyang, Auhui 233100, People's Republic of China
Hongyan Yang
Affiliation:
Soybean Research Institute, National Center for Soybean Improvement, MOA Key Laboratory for Biology and Genetic Improvement of Soybean (General), National Key Laboratory for Crop Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210095, People's Republic of China
Shihua Xiang
Affiliation:
Soybean Research Institute, National Center for Soybean Improvement, MOA Key Laboratory for Biology and Genetic Improvement of Soybean (General), National Key Laboratory for Crop Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210095, People's Republic of China
Wubing Wang
Affiliation:
Soybean Research Institute, National Center for Soybean Improvement, MOA Key Laboratory for Biology and Genetic Improvement of Soybean (General), National Key Laboratory for Crop Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210095, People's Republic of China
Guangnan Xing
Affiliation:
Soybean Research Institute, National Center for Soybean Improvement, MOA Key Laboratory for Biology and Genetic Improvement of Soybean (General), National Key Laboratory for Crop Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210095, People's Republic of China
Tuanjie Zhao
Affiliation:
Soybean Research Institute, National Center for Soybean Improvement, MOA Key Laboratory for Biology and Genetic Improvement of Soybean (General), National Key Laboratory for Crop Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210095, People's Republic of China
Junyi Gai
Affiliation:
Soybean Research Institute, National Center for Soybean Improvement, MOA Key Laboratory for Biology and Genetic Improvement of Soybean (General), National Key Laboratory for Crop Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210095, People's Republic of China
Corresponding

Abstract

Annual wild soybean characterized with more number of branches and pods may contain favourable exotic genes/alleles for improving the yield potential of cultivated soybeans. To evaluate the wild alleles/segments, the chromosome segment substitution line population SojaCSSLP3 comprising 158 lines with N24852 (wild) as the donor and NN1138-2 (cultivated) as the recurrent parent was tested under three environments. The phenotypic data along with 198 simple sequence repeat markers were analysed for qualitative trait loci (QTL)/segments associated with the number of branches on the main stem (BN) and number of pods per plant (PN) using the inclusive composite interval mapping procedure (RSTEP-LRT-ADD model) of ICIM version 3.0. The analysis was carried out for individual environments due to a significant G × E interaction. A total of eight QTL/segments associated with BN and eight QTL/segments associated with PN were detected under the three environments, with all the wild segments having positive effects. Among these, two QTL/segments for each of the two traits could be detected under two or three environments and three QTL/segments could be detected for both traits. Four QTL/segments associated with BN and one QTL/segment associated with PN were identified only in SojaCSSLP3, not reported for cultivated crosses in the literature. The detected wild segments may provide materials for further characterization, cloning and pyramiding of the alleles conferring the two traits.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © NIAB 2014 

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QTL mapping for the number of branches and pods using wild chromosome segment substitution lines in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]
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