Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-6f8dk Total loading time: 0.501 Render date: 2021-02-26T08:31:54.671Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Inducing variability in multi-cut forage sorghum through mutagenesis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2012

S. K. Pahuja
Affiliation:
Chaudhary Charan Singh Haryana Agricultural University (CCSHAU), Hisar, India
C. Aruna
Affiliation:
Directorate of Sorghum Research (DSR), Rajendranagar, Hyderabad500 030, AP, India
P. K. Shrotria
Affiliation:
Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture and Technology (GBPUAT), Pantnagar, Uttaranchal, India
Simarjit Kaur
Affiliation:
Punjab Agricultural University (PAU), Ludhiana, Punjab, India
B. R. Ranwah
Affiliation:
Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology (MPUAT), Udaipur, Rajasthan, India
J. V. Patil
Affiliation:
Directorate of Sorghum Research (DSR), Rajendranagar, Hyderabad500 030, AP, India
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Improvement in multi-cut forage sorghum varieties that can perform better than SSG 59-3, a sweet Sudan grass released in 1974, has been a challenge. Efforts were made to create variability in SSG 59-3 through mutagenesis using both physical and chemical mutagens. Fifteen such mutants were evaluated for 2 years in different locations in India. Considerable variability was observed for important fodder yield and quality traits. SSG 237 flowered 10 d early than SSG 59-3. SSG 231, SSG 260, SSG 232 and SSG 237 had high protein percentage and in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD) values compared with SSG 59-3. Hydrocyanic acid (HCN), a major anti-nutritional factor, was low in six mutants, the lowest being in SSG 226. This variability can be used in different breeding programmes aimed at improving multi-cut forage sorghum varieties. The lines with improved fodder quality (low HCN, high protein and IVDMD) can be used in the breeding programme for the improvement in multi-cut forage sorghum varieties.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © NIAB 2012 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Anonymous (2007) NRCS – Perspective Plan: Vision 2025. Hyderabad: National Research Centre for Sorghum, pp. 48.Google Scholar
Anonymous (2011) Progress Report 2011–12. All India Coordinated Sorghum Improvement Project (AICSIP). Hyderabad: Directorate of Sorghum Research (DSR).Google Scholar
Cheeke, PR (1998) Natural Toxicants in Feed, Forages and Poisonous Plants. Danville, IL: Interstate Publishers.Google Scholar
Eberhart, SA and Russell, WA (1966) Stability parameters for comparing varieties. Crop Science 6: 3640.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gilchrist, DG, Lueschen, WE and Hittle, CN (1967) Revised method for the preparation of standards in the sodium picrate assay of HCN. Crop Science 7: 267268.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hoveland, CS and Monson, WG (1980) Genetic and environmental effects on forage quality. In: Crop Quality, Storage and Utilization. Madison, WI: American Society of Agronomy and Crop Science Society of America, pp. 139168.Google Scholar
Indostat Servies (2004) Windostat. Hyderabad: Indostat Services.Google Scholar
Jackson, ML (1973) Soil Chemical Analysis. New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd.Google Scholar
Jain, SM, Brar, DS and Ahloowalia, BS (1998) Somaclonal Variation and Induced Mutations in Crop Improvement. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, Printed in Great Britain, pp. 313.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kharkwal, MC and Shu, QY (2009) The role of induced mutations in world food security. In: Shu, QY (ed.) Induced Plant Mutations in the Genomics Era. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, pp. 3338.Google Scholar
Mechrez, AZ and Orskov, ER (1977) A study of artificial fibre bag technique for determining digestibility of feeds in the rumen. Journal of Agricultural Sciences Cambridge 88: 645650.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Micke, A, Donini, B and Maluszynski, M (1987) Induced mutations for crop improvement – a review. Tropical Agriculture 64: 259278.Google Scholar
Muller, HJ (1927) Artificial transmutation of the gene. Science 66: 8487.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Paroda, RS and Lodhi, GP (1978) ‘SSG 59-3’ a sweet Sudan grass for multicut programme. Indian farming 28: 31.Google Scholar
Reddy, BVS, Ramesh, S and Reddy, PS (2004) Sorghum breeding research at ICRISAT – goals, strategies, methods and accomplishments. International Sorghum and Millets Newsletter 45: 512.Google Scholar
Stadler, LJ (1928) Mutations in barley induced by X rays and radium. Science 68: 186187.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wheeler, JL, Mulcahy, C, Walcott, JJ and Rapp, GG (1990) Factors affecting the hydrogen cyanide potential of forage sorghum. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research 41: 10931100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 3
Total number of PDF views: 26 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 26th February 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Inducing variability in multi-cut forage sorghum through mutagenesis
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Inducing variability in multi-cut forage sorghum through mutagenesis
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Inducing variability in multi-cut forage sorghum through mutagenesis
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *