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Genetic reticulation and interrelationships among citrullus species as revealed by joint analysis of shared AFLPs and species-specific SSR alleles

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 July 2009

Padmavathi Nimmakayala
Affiliation:
Department of Biology and Gus R. Douglass Institute, West Virginia State University, Institute, WV 25112, USA
Yan R. Tomason
Affiliation:
Department of Biology and Gus R. Douglass Institute, West Virginia State University, Institute, WV 25112, USA Department of Selection and Seed Production, Dnepropetrovsk State Agrarian University, Voroshilov 25, Dnepropetrovsk 49600, Ukraine
Jooha Jeong
Affiliation:
Department of Biology and Gus R. Douglass Institute, West Virginia State University, Institute, WV 25112, USA
Sathish K. Ponniah
Affiliation:
Department of Biology and Gus R. Douglass Institute, West Virginia State University, Institute, WV 25112, USA
Anoji Karunathilake
Affiliation:
Department of Biology and Gus R. Douglass Institute, West Virginia State University, Institute, WV 25112, USA
Amnon Levi
Affiliation:
USDA, ARS, US Vegetable Laboratory, 2875 Savannah Highway, Charleston, SC 29414, USA
Ramasamy Perumal
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-2132, USA
Umesh K. Reddy
Affiliation:
Department of Biology and Gus R. Douglass Institute, West Virginia State University, Institute, WV 25112, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Thirty-one accessions of Citrullus spp. belonging to Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus, C. lanatus var. citroides and Citrullus colocynthis were subjected to phylogenetic analysis using combined datasets of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) and simple sequence repeats (SSRs). Tree topologies inferred by neighbour-joining analysis have resolved the phylogenic relationships among the species with special reference to established taxonomic classification. In this study, we have clearly resolved species boundaries of various taxa of citroides, lanatus and colocynthis into three well-supported clusters. Clustering pattern of principal component analysis with the shared polymorphisms using the subsets of data between any two taxon combinations helped to elucidate the introgression and interrelationships among the species. We report two major groups of C. lanatus taxa, one of which has undergone wide introgressions with the taxa of C. lanatus var. citroides and C. colocynthis. In this paper, we identified 583 AFLP bands that are polymorphic within the var. lanatus of C. lanatus, which is the largest set ever reported. The species-specific diagnostic SSRs and polymorphic AFLPs that are informative within and between the taxa reported in this paper would be immensely useful for future studies of these economically important genera.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © NIAB 2009

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