Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-t4qhp Total loading time: 0.354 Render date: 2022-08-17T20:06:07.393Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Editors' Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2001

Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Extract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

Three of the articles in this issue of Plainsong & Medieval Music were presented at a session devoted to medieval saints' offices sponsored by the Plainsong and Mediaeval Music Society at the 1999 International Medieval Congress at the University of Leeds. Two of the papers (Caldwell, Hiley) are devoted to English saints, while a third (Hankeln) surveys offices, monastic and secular, of the sainted royal patrons of the diocese of Bamberg, Henry and Kunigunde. Elizabeth Leach's article on the four-voice balades of Guillaume de Machaut brings together considerations of transmission, fourteenth-century contrapuntal theory, and performance practice.

Beginning with this issue of Plainsong & Medieval Music every article will be preceded by a short abstract. Brief identifications of the authors, who will most likely be already known to readers in the relatively small field of medieval music research, will include their e-mail addresses.

Type
Editorial
Copyright
© 2001 Cambridge University Press
You have Access

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Editors' Introduction
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Editors' Introduction
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Editors' Introduction
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *