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Immunological relationships during primary infection with Heligmosomoides polygyrus: Th2 cytokines and primary response phenotype

  • F. N. Wahid (a1), J. M. Behnke (a1), R. K. Grencis (a2), K. J. Else (a2) and A. W. Ben-Smith (a1)...

Summary

The primary immune response to infection with Heligmosomoides polygyrus was studied in mice differing in response phenotype (fast-SWR, intermediate-NIH, slow-CBA). Marked IgGl and IgE but not IgG2a antibody responses were detected in infected mice and the former were more intense in fast compared with slow responder strains. Mastocytosis, MMCP-1, and the secretion of cytokines by mesenteric lymph node cells, following stimulation in vitro by Con A, were also more intense initially in SWR mice. Secretion of IL-4 declined in all strains by the 4th week of infection, irrespective of response phenotype. IL-10 was only produced briefly by SWR mice. However, the temporal patterns of secretion of IL-3 and IL-9 clearly distinguished fast from slow responder phenotypes. Following initial intense secretion of IL-3, production declined in all strains but in the 5–6th weeks enhanced secretion was evident in SWR and NIH mice and was sustained until week 10 p.i. In contrast, CBA mice never recovered from the initial down-regulation in weeks 3–4 and secretion declined to background levels by week 6 p.i. despite the continued presence of adult worms. Temporal changes in the secretion of IL-9 were very similar: secretion declined in CBA mice by week 6 p.i., whilst SWR and NIH mice continued to secrete high amounts. We suggest that fast and slow responder mice differ not only in their initial responsiveness to parasite antigens but also in their ability to sustain a Th2 response to the parasite and we propose that the latter is in part determined by their different susceptibilities to parasite-mediated immunomodulation. Only the fast responder strains can sustain a Th2 response of sufficient intensity to facilitate expulsion of adult worms.

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Keywords

Immunological relationships during primary infection with Heligmosomoides polygyrus: Th2 cytokines and primary response phenotype

  • F. N. Wahid (a1), J. M. Behnke (a1), R. K. Grencis (a2), K. J. Else (a2) and A. W. Ben-Smith (a1)...

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