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Infection with Trypanosoma lewisi or Trypanosoma musculi may promote the spread of Toxoplasma gondii

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2021

Jiang-Mei Gao
Affiliation:
Center for Parasitic Organisms, State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China Institute of Zoology, Guangdong Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510260, China
Si-Qi Yi
Affiliation:
Center for Parasitic Organisms, State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China
Guo-Qing Geng
Affiliation:
Center for Parasitic Organisms, State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China
Zhi-Shen Xu
Affiliation:
Center for Parasitic Organisms, State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China
Geoff Hide
Affiliation:
Biomedical Research Centre and Ecosystems and Environment Research Centre, School of Science, Engineering and Environment, University of Salford, Salford, M5 4WT, UK
Zhao-Rong Lun
Affiliation:
Center for Parasitic Organisms, State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China Biomedical Research Centre and Ecosystems and Environment Research Centre, School of Science, Engineering and Environment, University of Salford, Salford, M5 4WT, UK
De-Hua Lai
Affiliation:
Center for Parasitic Organisms, State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Toxoplasma gondii can infect almost all warm-blooded vertebrates with pathogensis being largely influenced by the host immune status. As important epidemiological hosts, rodents are globally distributed and are also commonly found infected with haemoflagellates, such as those in the genus Trypanosoma. We here address whether and how co-infection with trypanosomes can influence T. gondii infection in laboratory models. Rats of five strains, co-infected with T. lewisi and mice of four strains, co-infected with T. musculi, were found to be more or less susceptible to T. gondii infection, respectively, with corresponding increased or decreased brain cyst burdens. Downregulation of iNOS expression and decreased NO production or reverse were observed in the peritoneal macrophages of rats or mice, infected with trypanosomes, respectively. Trypanosoma lewisi and T. musculi can modulate host immune responses, either by enhancement or suppression and influence the outcome of Toxoplasma infection.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

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