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Identification and diagnosis of Leishmania mexicana complex isolates by polymerase chain reaction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 April 2009

S. Eresh
Affiliation:
MRC Outstation of NIMR, Molteno Laboratories, Department of Pathology, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QP, UK
S. M. McCallum
Affiliation:
MRC Outstation of NIMR, Molteno Laboratories, Department of Pathology, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QP, UK
D. C. Barker
Affiliation:
MRC Outstation of NIMR, Molteno Laboratories, Department of Pathology, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QP, UK

Summary

Following cloning of Leishmania (L.) amazonensis kinetoplast DNA two recombinant clones were identified: one specific for L. (L.) amazonensis and the other specific for L. (L.) amazonensis and closely related isolates. DNA sequences from these clones were compared with those of other kinetoplastids and oligonucleotide primers were designed to be used in the polymerase chain reaction. A pair of these primers has been shown not only to be highly specific for L. mexicana complex isolates but can also be used to distinguish between L. (L.) mexicana and L. (L.) amazonensis isolates. These primers have been tested with water-lysed cultures, crude DNA extracts from human patients, potential host reservoirs, sandfly vectors and with cell pellets after isoenzyme characterization. The results of these tests indicate that the primers can be used specifically in the presence of excess host DNA originating from the majority of South American countries.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1994

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Identification and diagnosis of Leishmania mexicana complex isolates by polymerase chain reaction
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