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Genotyping of human cystic echinococcosis in Xinjiang, PR China

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 July 2006

J. M. BART
Affiliation:
First Teaching Hospital, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830000, PR China SERF Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University of Franche-Comté, Besancon 25000, France
M. ABDUKADER
Affiliation:
First Teaching Hospital, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830000, PR China
Y. L. ZHANG
Affiliation:
First Teaching Hospital, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830000, PR China
R. Y. LIN
Affiliation:
First Teaching Hospital, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830000, PR China
Y. H. WANG
Affiliation:
First Teaching Hospital, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830000, PR China
M. NAKAO
Affiliation:
Department of Parasitology, Asahikawa Medical College, Asahikawa, Hokkaido, Japan
A. ITO
Affiliation:
Department of Parasitology, Asahikawa Medical College, Asahikawa, Hokkaido, Japan
P. S. CRAIG
Affiliation:
Cestode Zoonoses Research Group, Biomedical Sciences Research Institute and School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Greater Manchester M54WT, UK
R. PIARROUX
Affiliation:
SERF Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University of Franche-Comté, Besancon 25000, France
D. A. VUITTON
Affiliation:
SERF Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University of Franche-Comté, Besancon 25000, France
H. WEN
Affiliation:
First Teaching Hospital, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830000, PR China

Abstract

The Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, multi-ethnic province in northwestern China, is one of the most important foci of human cystic echinococcosis (CE) in the world. Two Echinococcus granulosus genotypes (G1 and G6) are known to infect the intermediate hosts in this area but, to date, the source of the human infection remains unclear. The current study aimed to genetically analyse 67 hydatid cysts removed from 47 CE patients for which epidemiological, clinical and serological data were also recorded. Mitochondrial cox 1 gene sequencing suggested that the E. granulosus G1 genotype is the major source of infection (45/47 CE patients). Nevertheless, for the first time in China, 2 patients were found with hydatid cysts of the G6 genotype. In addition, 45 E. granulosus gravid tapeworms, isolated from 13 dogs, were genotyped. The majority of adult worms (42/45) exhibited the G1 genotype, whereas 3 adult tapeworms with the G6 genotype were found in one dog, that also harboured E. granulosus tapeworms of the G1 genotype. This sympatric occurrence of G1 and G6 genotypes of E. granulosus, not only in the same area but also in the same definitive host, raises the interesting question of putative genetic recombination between these E. granulosus genotypes.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
2006 Cambridge University Press

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