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Genetic diversity of Bartonella genotypes found in the striped field mouse (Apodemus agrarius) in Central Europe

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 June 2016

JASNA KRALJIK
Affiliation:
Department of Vector-Borne Diseases, Institute of Parasitology SAS, Hlinkova 3, 040 01 Košice, Slovakia Department of Zoology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, 842 15 Bratislava 4, Mlynská dolina, Slovakia
ANNA PAZIEWSKA-HARRIS
Affiliation:
Parasitology Unit, Royal Tropical Institute, KIT Biomedical Research, Meibergdreef 39, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
DANA MIKLISOVÁ
Affiliation:
Department of Vector-Borne Diseases, Institute of Parasitology SAS, Hlinkova 3, 040 01 Košice, Slovakia
LUCIA BLAŇAROVÁ
Affiliation:
Department of Vector-Borne Diseases, Institute of Parasitology SAS, Hlinkova 3, 040 01 Košice, Slovakia
LADISLAV MOŠANSKÝ
Affiliation:
Department of Vector-Borne Diseases, Institute of Parasitology SAS, Hlinkova 3, 040 01 Košice, Slovakia
MARTIN BONA
Affiliation:
Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University, Šrobárova 2, 041 80 Košice, Slovakia
MICHAL STANKO
Affiliation:
Department of Vector-Borne Diseases, Institute of Parasitology SAS, Hlinkova 3, 040 01 Košice, Slovakia
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Summary

We investigated the diversity of Bartonella in Apodemus agrarius, an important rodent of peri-domestic habitats, which has spread into Europe in the past 1000 years. Spleen samples of 344 A. agrarius from Eastern Slovakia were screened for the presence of Bartonella spp. using 16S–23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer region and bacteria were detected in 9% of rodents. Based on sequencing of three housekeeping genes (gltA, rpoB and groEL) Bartonella genotypes were ascribed to the species typical for mice and voles: B. grahamii, B. taylorii and B. birtlesii. However, the study also confirmed presence of genotypes belonging to the B. clarridgeiae/B. rochalimae clade, and the B. elizabethae/B. tribocorum clade, which are not commonly found in woodland rodents. In addition, a potential recombination event between these two genotypes was noted, which highlights an important role of A. agrarius in shaping Bartonella diversity and evolution.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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