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The final goodbye

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 October 2012

Frank E. Mott
Affiliation:
Department of Hematology/Oncology, Thoracic Medical Oncology, Ochsner Cancer Institute, Gayle & Tom Benson Cancer Center, New Orleans, Louisiana
Joel D. Marcus
Affiliation:
Psychosocial Oncology & Palliative Services. Ochsner Cancer Institute, Gayle & Tom Benson Cancer Center, New Orleans, Louisiana
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

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Type
Essays/Personal Reflections
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012 

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References

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